Tag Archives: World of Tanks

Trumpeter 1/72 IS-7

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Well, another tank I would have not known about had it not for World of Tanks.

There it is a top tier Soviet heavy tank; in real life it was, well, a Soviet heavy tank. The last heavy tank, in fact, in service, ever. It is a fairly obscure vehicle, so it was a very welcome surprise seeing it in plastic. (Normally you would expect small companies producing a resin version for a literal arm and leg.)

The Trumpeter kit is simple to assemble, and has pretty good detail. The whole running gear and track assembly comes as one unit, which, I have to say, was not a bad solution. It did make building quick, for sure.

After the Vallejo primer I layered citadell olive green with increasing amount of yellow onto the tank – it produces a pretty nice looking green for the tank.

I did some sponge chipping, a filter with Tamiya transparent yellow, and some blending with oils, a ton of filters, and acrylic pencils for the streaks and dust. The mud was Vallejo’s industrial mud mixed with different pigments. I think the results are not half bad.

Let’s hope Trumpeter does some other esotheric tanks, like the IS-6, T57, ELC-AMX, T-10, AMX-50 in plastic, too. All in all this is a neat little kit, worth picking up. Also, check this build out, too.

Modelcollect 1/72 Waffentrager Ausf. E-100 with 128mm gun

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Modelcollect seems to specialise in two types of Braille scale vehicles: post-war Soviet-Russian wheeled and tracked vehicles, and the increasingly esoteric WWII German what-ifs, paper panzers and artillery (rockets and guns). Some of those were actual plans, like the E series of tanks, but a lot of them are just pure fabrications, like the walker-type tanks, and the different modifications based on the E series. They also make a 1/72 scale P1000 Ratte.

 

The topic of this review is a fictional vehicle, albeit a fictional vehicle from the online game World of Tanks. In the game it was a game-breaking tank destroyer with a four (or six, depending on the gun used) shot autoloader.

Eventually it was removed as it was overpowered as heck, but I was really happy to see it in plastic form. (Never had a chance to play it, but it sure was satisfying catching one in reload…) It is essentially a 12,8 cm Kw.K. 44 L/55 gun mounted on an E-100 chassis in a large, open turret and an autoloader. It is very interesting to see the effect of a massively popular game on the modelling world; I do hope more models will follow. (Amusing Hobby seems to follow a similar pattern; they have issued the same model in 1/35.)

The instructions do have some sort of a history for the type, but as the type itself it is absolutely fictional, it is not something to be taken too seriously.

 

The kit

The box is your typical Modelcollect box, with a nice painting of the tank destroyer on the front. The plastic is good quality, although there is flash around certain parts; especially the drive wheels needed a little cleanup. The detail is OK, and we do get some PE for the engine deck screens. We do not, however, get a metal barrel, which is a shame, especially considering that the massive gun needs to be glued together from two halves; it’s quite an old-school kit in this regards. (I really like Modelcollect’s Russian MTBs; they are true gems with all the PE and metal barrels provided. This model is definitely a bit more of a ‘budget option’ compared to them.)

 

At first glance the part number is quite high, but this is somewhat deceptive. Since the model is made out of several other Modelcollect products, naturally there will be a lot of leftovers after the construction.

 

The assembly is not very difficult; beginners will find no real challenge putting the model together. For some reason the roadwheels require you to glue little plastic rings between the wheels, similar to the 1/35 polycap style wheels, which is somewhat puzzling. (There are two caps fewer included than would be necessary, but they are not actually needed for the running gear’s assembly; the wheels can be glued to the swing arms without them without any problems.)

The large gun-shield is an elaborate piece of plastic; due to the injection moulding process a few moulding lines will need to be sanded off. The bottom part, however does not fit perfectly to the top; it’s not a huge issue, but I definitely needed to fiddle with it.

The tracks are the rubber type vinyl tracks, so installation is simple, although I do prefer the link-and-length option that is provided with other Modelcollect German superheavy tanks. (It is a personal preference, admittedly.)

Since the large gun shield covers quite a lot of visible detail, you will have to do most of the painting before final assembly.

After priming and applying the base coat of dunkelgelb (Mig Ammo), I messed up the free-hand camo, so I decided to give a try to the Mig Ammo washable white… Nobody will know I am covering up a mistake, will they?

After wearing the white down a bit with a wet brush, I started weathering. I wanted to do a really heavily weathered tank… a tank that is going through the longest winter ever – a tank from Westeros. Streaking dirt, mud and everything you can think of… I just piled it on. I used oil paints, mud products and pigments by Mig Ammo and Vallejo, filters of different color (even green – interestingly it gave a depth to the white color), acrylic paints, acrylic and a silver pencil. The results are pretty nice; I now have a weathered, battered veteran on my shelf.

 

 

Zvezda T-28 Soviet heavy tank, 1/100

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I bought a couple of Zvezda’s 1/100 kits during the Tank Festival in Bovingdon, in 2018. They are cheap, and meant for wargaming; I thought I’d give a try building them as display models. They are quick to build, and do not take up much space – ideal if you just want to have an example of a tank sitting on your shelf. Here’s the first one: the T-28 heavy tank.

There is really not much about the build: it is a snap-together kit. The photos of the gallery bellow are in sequence of building and weathering.
 

I tried to add subtle dust, streaking, and other effects; in this scale it is very easy to go overboard. The tank nevertheless looks a bit dull; I think some serious color modulation would have helped.
All in all it is a nice representation of the tank. It does not include decals (I took a red star from an airplane kit), and it does not feature the antenna on the main turret. Since it was not present on all tanks, I did not bother making one; it should not be difficult to scratch one if you are not as relaxed about it.

Armory 1/72 M41A1/A2 Walker Bulldog p2.

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Part 1

And the published review. (It’s probably worth checking it out if you want to build the model; I pointed out some issues with the model, and gave some tips for the build.)

Once the model was primed, I sprayed Citadel’s olive green (from the airbrush-ready range) mixed with Gunze’s yellow. The first coats had no yellow added, the subsequent coats had more and more stirred in, and I made sure I only lightly misted these on, focusing on the top of the vehicle. So the bottom of the chassis has no yellow at all, while the top received the most.

The model was fully assembled, so the tracks received some green paint; I simply went over with a black/antracite color to correct these oversprays. I found that it is quite simple and easy to paint models with tracks and all already installed, rather than trying to install the tracks on a fully painted model. The dark primer provides a very nice “shadow” to areas where the green paint did not get to.

I added the decals (one “Deliquent” decal was lost in the process…), and this is where I realized that there was not enough room between the grab handles to add the number… Something to look out for in your build. (I am not unduly worried about the turret, since I will use a different one.)

After a brown pin wash, followed with a black pinwash on the engine deck, I covered the model with semi-matte varnish.

I used Tamiya’s weathering sticks for dust and mud – again, this is not the end manifestation of the model, so I kept weathering minimum. (I found that using a wet brush to apply the product to the model, and then using a clean, wet brush to adjust the effect works wonders.) I painted the muffler cover using several rust tones, and used a silver pencil on the edges to give a metallic shine to the model.

That’s pretty much it. I am thinking about magnetizing the turret so I can just switch it (a’la KV-220, T-150) once I finish the actual model I wanted to build using this kit.

 

Armory 1/72 M41A1/A2 Walker Bulldog p1.

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Well, I decided to buy Armory’s new injection molded model, the Walker Bulldog. I have written a review of it on Armorama; when it comes live I will link it here.

My aim with the purchase was to do a conversion, I was not particularly interested in the Bulldog itself.

 

As I wrote in the review, the build was pretty nice; I found no major hurdles -apart from the tool rack which I just left off. I also did not install the gun lock since I will be using the chassis for a different vehicle with a different gun. There are some minor issues with the model, but none of them are deal breaking (and at least the gun is not assembled from two halves…)

 

There’s an awful lot of PE coming with the kit; the smaller parts were glued on using white glue. The sink marks on the tracks are somewhat annoying but they will be filled with some mud at the end.

 

Next up: painting and weathering.

 

And then – when I buy the necessary supplies: THE CONVERSION.

Tankfest, 2018, part 5. Baking outside

 

There were several vendors in tents selling replica weapons, army surplus and scale models. There were several food vendors, too (selling for surprisingly reasonable prices), and a lot of heat-stricken people wandering about. Since it was Friday, the program was only a “dress rehersal” for the main events of Saturday and Sunday; regardless, seeing (and hearing) these tanks was pretty impressive.

I never thought the clicking of the tracks would be louder than the engine’s roar… these things are loud.

It was also very interesting to see how small the IS-3 was compared to the other heavies; however what it lacked it size, it made up for it with smoke… the engine was belching white diesel exhaust like nobody’s business.

As I said it was really hot. If I recall correctly, the Centurion actually had to wait in the arena a bit so it cooled down before it could go back to its parking spot.

I probably should have taken a couple of videos, too, but I wanted to enjoy the show. When you are taking photos, you already focusing on something else; I did not want to compound the issue with switching between photos and video, too. Probably should have given the camera to my ever patient wife, but she was actually enjoying this part of the festival.

There were people dressed in historical uniforms, actual tankers, and tank restorers mixed with us, mere mortals.

 

 

Later in the afternoon there was a demonstration of infantry-tank tactics in WWII. An M4 was attacking a German position with a PnzIV defending, but since it was only a rehersal, the soldiers were just strolling next to the tank. This, and the lack of pyrotechnics made the show distinctly uninteresting…

Needless to say, we did not mind the short program. The interior of the museum was really inviting with the airconditioning on.

 

 

 

Tankfest, 2018, part 4. The Tank Restoration Area

Well, this is one of the most interesting areas of the museum, and if my information is correct, it is normally closed for the public. Except on Tank Fest!

Lots of spare parts, lots of tanks and other vehicles in various states of direpair… things you can’t usually see: T14 Heavy Tank, Conway tank destroyer and many other vehicles I have only heard about.

The only problem was room: it was difficult to squeze through the tanks and take half-decent photos. The exhibit is also so very useful as a reference for scratches, faded paint, paint chips, oil stains, dust and rust.

 

 

Wargaming set up a World of Tanks event here: you were allowed to play thirty minutes on a press account, and you got a code for a Churchill III, a T-shirt, and a backpack. (Not very sturdy ones, but still.)

I managed to try the FV4005 (presently grinding for it), and the Defender -to see how OP it is. In my hand it was not very… Unfortunaltely I had no time to try the rare, or never released tanks also in the garage of the account.

Oh well.

 

Keep an eye out -more photos are incoming.

Tankfest, 2018, part 3. Tigers and Panthers

 

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The Tiger exhibit. Lots of Tigers…

Tiger 131

 

Ferdinand

 

Tiger II (Henschel turret)

 

And finally, the Panther (which is in another part of the exhibition)

 

Tried to take photos of scratches, oil leakage and damage. (Obviously they are museum exhibits, but they still can come useful.)

 

Keep an eye out -more photos are incoming.