Tag Archives: warhammer 40K

Perturbado

I have no idea who makes this figure – I got it from a Facebook buy/sell group (as I do a lot of stuff, because buying used is significantly cheaper).

He is about the size of a space marine (probably a tad smaller), which is to say, he is small. I guess he can be seen as a practice for the larger-scale version by Mystic Wargames which I am currently painting and reviewing.

Heresy Lab: Lord of Decay, Rage Lords

It is great to be a mini painter these days -even an amateur one, like myself. We have options now, and options are good for us. In this case we have yet another option for Mortarion, Primarch of the Death guard, this time from Heresy Labs. (There are also two options from Mystic Wargames, should you be interested. I know I am; they are on the bucket list, among a thousand other items. Perhaps I was not as close to Nirvana as I thought I was.)

I wrote a review about the figure on Modelgeek if interested; here is the painted product.

The good thing about the Death Guard is that “messy” and “dirty” are part and parcel of the whole thing. Easy to paint for armor painters…

Avunculus Fragili part 2.

Well, I introduced him in a previous post. Since then he has undergone some improvement (at least I would like to think so). He is a riot of colors, but he IS a chaos knight after all.

I used one of Wargame Exclusive‘s chaos trophies on the pauldron (the rest will go on the chaos Warhound when I get to build it finally), and some of the extra heads as trophies from the set itself.

So let me introduce Mr Fragile v2.0: a more colorful version. What really, really annoys me that he had a buddy unassembled, and he seems to have gone missing when I moved back to Hungary two years ago. I just can’t find the sprues.

Anyhow. He still needs his mask, some tweaking, and I would add some more weathering- some oil streaks and whatnot. But I have to say I am pretty happy with the result. And I know. It is not a Golden Demon contender… but he is my chaos knight.

Also, if you play, I found a cheaper proxy for Knights.

Some finished photos

Now, where could the other knight be? I even have a resin pilot waiting for it…

Avunculus Fragili

OK, so here is this imperial knight conversion. My 18 month old daughter, when she first saw the “skeleton” without the armor on (pretty hideous sight) cried happily “Uncle Fragile” (or “mister Fragile”, depending on the translation), and started hugging it. She had a concept of my toys being fragile and that it was a male… She is very empathic, by the way. I have Angron himself under painting, and she calls him “Uncle Crying”, and keeps kissing the figure telling him not to cry. Which is both sweet and funny.

Anyhow, this is how the knight looks like presently. I do not like it at all; the paintjob is just the base so it is not finished, but I am not convinced it actually looks the corrupted, twisted parody of its original self.

I wanted to introduce him to the world, and I also welcome any suggestions how to improve it with further painting/weathering; I do have some ideas. We will see how it turns out.

Games Workshop – Thousand Sons space marines

Well, two Thousand Sons space marines, both post-Heresy. The first one is a Rubric marine belonging to Ashur-Kai (Talon of Horus, The Black Legion).

Pre-Herey colors with one pauldron painted black, indicating his aliance to the Black Legion.

The other is just your run-of-the-mill Rubric Marine.

Games Workshop – Chaos Space Marine Aspiring Champion

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I love the meanace radiating from his pose. I do not necessarily like the way he turned out.

Let’s face it: miniature painting is also something you have to learn just as scale model building, painting and weathering. Not to mention I still can’t nail down how to paint red. Well, I guess this will be the next big step -after having painted a lot of these guys, I finally need to learn how to do it ‘properly’. The issue was so far that minis were a ‘distraction’ so far between larger armor projects; something to do when you really got fed up with removing ejector pin marks from two hundred track links, and not something I did as my primary interest. I’m pretty OK about how my Death Guard minis have turned out, and some of my nonDeath Guards ones, but I still feel there’s a gulf of difference between my minis and tanks with regards to quality.

 

Since I have quite a few of these figures waiting to be finished, I guess there will be plenty of room for improvement.

Artel W Miniatures – The Captive Unleashed (Cherubael)

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Since the Eisenhorn trilogy is one of my favorite WH40K books, when I saw this miniature coming out, I obviously bought it.  I was already trying to think of ways to modify some minis to looks like a daemonhost, but Artel W made my life much easier. (I bought these guys to serve as a basis.)
Cherubael is one of the main characters of the book – the nemesis, later servant, and even later the last remaining ally of the titular Inquisitor; he is just as a fascinating character as Eisenhorn himself.
The pose of the figure is especially good: the demon caught in a human body trying to break free of the chains -and spells- binding him. The fact that the figure is actually floating (kept upright by the chains) is an especially great touch.

The miniature is 28mm, and has an incredible level of detail- much better than my skills can give it justice for. Regardless I did try. (What is especially galling that the mini looks actually OK by eye. I thought I did the blending on the skin quite well until I saw the photos.)

Now Eisenhorn will have a friend to play with finally.

(The company has been issuing different characters from the Eisenhorn stories; lately the chair-bound Ravernor was released.)

Grim Skull Miniatures: Mortarion

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The world of tabletop gaming has given us better and better detailed miniatures over the years, along with increasingly detailed universes through media like books, comics and computer games. One of my favorite is…

 

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Warhammer 40K. The picture above will make it clear why.

 

There are enormous gaps in the “official” miniature offerings in the available fractions, and also what is available tends to be somewhat expensive. A lot of smaller companies spotted these gaps on the market, and started to produce similar-but-not-quite-the-same miniatures that are not available from either Games Workshop or Forgeworld, usually for a friendlier price.

Mortarion did receive an official figure by GW, and another by Forgeworld, but I did not like either of those versions. The WH30K (pre-Heresy or Herey era) Forgeworld model did not really resonate with me, and the daemon prince figure looks very different from the man he used to be, twisted and bloated beyond recognition. In case of Mortarion it is an issue. True, the Primarch of the Death Guard Legion had fallen to Chaos, and has been turned into a Daemon Prince since the Horus Heresy. However the lore makes it clear that he is the one Primarch (alongside with Magnus, possibly) who remained as close to human as possible. Grimm Skull Miniatures has issued a Mortarion model that can be used both as a pre-daemon prince Primarch before or during the Heresy, or as a full-fledged daemon-prince (essentially the same figure plus two big, leathery wings). Yes, you can say it’s just lazy marketing. However since he is the most human of the daemon princes, and fans still debate if he could even return to the side of the Emperor again, as his red brother did, there IS a good argument for Grim Skull Miniatures’ choice.

The figure- as all of Grim Skull Miniatures figures I’ve seen so far- is very well sculpted and detailed. These figures are close enough to the “official” GW/Forgeworld aesthetics, but they also differ enough to look novel and unique; frankly I quite like how most of their figures look. The overall outline of power armor mixed with twisting and turning organic shapes look the way I imagine the Chaos-touched warriors. Talking about Magnus: there is also a figure that looks suspiciously like the Cyclops, only Grim Skull took him towards the Maya/Aztec aesthetics instead the ‘traditional’ Egyptian. (I’m not sure what to feel about the overemphasised feminine figures though, but if you like Tau pin-up girls and sexy female chaos space marines, here’s your chance.)

Mortarion, or Morty for his friends, looks exactly like his description in the Horus Heresy books. A gaunt man in an ornate, baroque power armor, with a cape covering his head, and censers hanging from his armor on chains. He has his power scythe Silence, however he does not have his handgun, Lantern. This is a glaring omission of the model; the gun is a prominent feature of the Primarch. Otherwise I do like it better than the pre-daemon Forgeworld figure, or the daemon prince GW model; he does radiate a sort of dark, solemn majesty with his ragged wings and elaborately decorated, corroded armor.

He comes with a pretty nice base to stand on with a broken pipe leaking who-knows-what. (It must be something corrosive because there is a skull in it.) We do get two such pipes; I used the extra with another Death Guard figure.

The assembly of these figures is usually a breeze. I did not like the original pose, because Morty looks like a particular shepherd the way he holds Silence. I turned his arm a bit to make it look more dynamic, although the attachment point is not designed to hold the arm well at this angle. (A scythe is an unbelievably impractical weapon at any rate; at least he should have straightened it, a’la revolting peasants. I think the Death Guard really puts style over effectiveness, when it comes to weaponry.)

The big issue, however, was the wings. There are simply no attachment points where they can be glued to, and the surface touching the back of the figure is so small, it was difficult to secure them even with small wires drilled into them.

The painting stage is usually where these models are made or ruined, and I have to confess I’m not a master painter. My main interests are armored vehicles, so my skills at blending and painting small details by brush leave much to be desired. I don’t particularly stick to the “Games Workshop School of Figure Painting” with the high contrasts and very fine layering/glazing, either. Since I have the daemon prince version, I did not paint him in clean, pre-Heresy colors; he got the full grime, rust and corruption treatment.

I used Vallejo’s black primer as a first coat, and used Lahman medium to create glazes in various browns and greens. I kept adding the glazes in very thin coats until I liked the greenish-brownish hue.

The bronze parts were painted using True Metal gold first (on larger surfaces I dry-brushed it on to keep the black as shadows in the recesses), and then followed it with several layers of oxidized bronze green colors as glazes. As finishing touch I reapplied the gold on rivets, thin edges, and other surfaces where the oxidised metal would be rubbed off.

The different pipings on the armor were painted with dark blue glazes to create a slightly different color without too big of a contrast.

I was uncertain of what colors the wings should have: they look like a cross between an insect’s wing and a bat’s. I did not want them to stand too much out of the general effect, so they got mostly the same treatment as the rest of the figure. The wings received a purple glaze, and the insectoid wing structure was shaded with ochre and brown oil paint blended into the base dry; it does look slightly iridescent and chitinous.

The tabard/cloak Morty is wearing got a similar layering treatment, only in this case I used a white base and added mostly brown colors. As a chaos prince of Nurgle, the god of disease, he can’t really be expected to have a spotless, white attire. (Having one at all is pretty silly since it would get caught in everything and anything.) I added further highlights, shading and discolorations using oil paints. After weeks of drying it is still somewhat shiny… This is a good lesson on getting out the linseed oil out of the oil paint before using it. (Just put a blob of paint onto a piece of cardboard and wait a few hours… Next time I will not skip on this step.) Right now I’ll go with the “can’t you see it’s leather??” defence. It turned out a bit darker than I would like, but there it is. As I said I’m not the best of figure painters.

The base was painted similarly to the figure: several layers of dark grey and brown glazes over black primer, then a little steel and gold True Metal paint drybrushed on here and there. The rubble got a bit of a rust and dust pigments, and the bronze areas got the same treatment as Morty’s armor.

Overall I really like the results -even with my admittedly limited skills managed to make it out into an impressive renderition of this

Games Workshop – Lord of Contagion

 

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It’s really hard to depict what “Chaos” and “corruption” is; figures, artwork and even novels resort to the usual tentacles, horns, crab-pincers, boobs, and in case of the Death Guard, decomposition and disease. (There’s an awesome video explaining what Chaos really is.) In this latter case I actually think they were right on target; these new figures -except for the silly blob-daemons all over- are pretty cool. They truly look corrupted and frightening. After doing the Chaos Rhino I was looking for another Death Guard figure to paint.

I have to admit I do not know anything about this particular figure, its stats and how it’s supposed to be played; I bought it on Ebay because I liked the pose. (I think it’s better than the Typhus models.)

The painting went reasonably simple; I decided to try using glazes. I created the glaze using ordinary Citadel paints and lahmian medium. I primed the model with Vallejo German grey primer, and then started adding layers upon layers of green mediums (and some brown) in different hues to depict the filthy, corroded, corrupted armor. The cape got a similar treatment using mostly browns with some green; once I got a nice base color I added streaks of oil paints directly from the tube. Once I was happy with the overall effect of the armor, I added dark brown pin-washes to add depth to the model. I painted the brass parts with Citadel Tin and dark bronze; the edges got some Vallejo True metal gold, and then a very thin varnish of turquoise to depict oxidated bronze. After the turquoise varnish I highlighted some edges with gold again.

The fumes of the figure were painted with different brightness of green: starting with a very bright, very light green, and building up darker and darker colors, with the light colors showing only in the deep recesses. As the last touch I rubbed some black pigments on the most protruding parts signifying smoke.

The pipe was an addition from Grim Skull Miniature’s Mortarion model (it came with two pipes). The base will need some work, but for now I declare this figure done.

I think it turned out pretty nice for an armor modeller. Milage may vary.