Tag Archives: rust

Making Rust p.4 – the sponge

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An ongoing project of exploring the creation of rust.

Here are some previous posts:

  1. Lifecolor’s rust washes
  2. Iron containing paint and oxidizer
  3. Windex chipping, hairspray chipping

And now the good ole’ sponge method. I’ve used it on the T-62 wreck I have just finished.

The method is simple: get a piece of sponge/the green stuff on the top of the sponge, dab it into the paint, dab most of it off on a piece of paper, and then apply the sponge in a dabbing motion onto the surface of the model.

This can be used in several ways. Either, as I did here, you depict a badly rusted object with some paint still clinging on the surface. In this case the base coat is a mixture of rust colors (which, incidentally, were also applied using the sponge).

There are a couple of things to keep in mind: use a lighter shade of the color the item was supposed to be painted with; the sun fades everything over time (after all the vehicle in question had to be sitting there for a long time to rust like this), and the final color will darken anyway, since you will be using filters and washes on the vehicle. It’s also a good idea to use several tones of the base color -green in this case. Start with larger patches of the lightest, and use consequently darker shades with smaller and smaller patches.

You can do it the other way around as well: depict some rust spots/chips on a painted surface. In this case you use rust colors (and make sure you use different tones, along with the lightened version of the base color) over the base color of the model. In this case make sure you have hardly any paint left in the sponge, and also be sure not to use it in the same position (so that the created spots are not uniform). I’ve used this method with the SU-122 and SU-76.

If you want to make it a step even further, use a lighter color of the base to create somewhat larger chips, and use a brush (or keep using the sponge) to fill them in with much less rust color -this way you can depict a moderately chipped surface easily. (The method used on the mudguards of the T-44 -a combination of sponge-on-sponge -for the mudgards- and brush-on-sponge -for the smaller chips.)

 

Of course, you can just let go of the sponge, and do everything with a fine brush; you get more control, but you have to be careful about being random, just like in the case of this T-55.

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All of these techniques should be done sparingly, and in several sessions. (It’s useful to come back and take a look at what you’ve achieved with a fresh eye.)

 

 

 

Obviously, these techniques are better used combined; with the T-62 I used the hairspray technique, the sponge, filters and brush. I’ve also used rust washes (with an airbrush), pigments mixed with Tamiya’s flat coat (coming up later), and oils blended with brushes. And yes, I did use some dedicated AK Interactive products, too, like different dark washes, and the light rust wash. (I’m turning to the dark side here.)

 

 

Addendum…

 

I’m making a difference! Awesome ūüôā

Someone got inspired to try this technique based on this post.

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Tamiya 1/35 T-62 with Verlinden damage set p4.

The first part of this build can be found here, the second here, and the third here.

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Well, the small dio is finally done. It’s been a long, long build. It took me more than a year back in the US to find the conversion set; I was lucky to grab it cheap from someone who gave up on it. It then sat in a box for the next couple of years, then brought back to Europe, and finally ended up in the UK. The actual build time was a couple of months; quite quick, really, but I did take a lot of shortcuts. These were mostly done out of necessity (of preserving my sanity); the set is not exactly user-friendly. The fit is poor at places, the instructions are horrid, and some parts are just plain impossible to do (like the installation of the turret ring). I’m not even mentioning the warped parts, like the gun barrel. (Wait, I just did…) So to save time, my already thinning hair, and money, I just rolled with what I had (with the exception of the gun barrel).

Anyhow, when all is said and done, it built up into a very inaccurate, but quite nice tank.

I tried to show a gradient of colors from back to front: burned out engine compartment dominated by rust colors, to the greenish hues of the frontal hull.

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The figure also took a LOT of time to hunt down; unfortunately it is long out of production, so my best bet was to get lucky and buy one from someone. (This is a really good reminder of buying things when they are available. However, it also is a sure way of building up a stash that would shame a hobby store, so there is a delicate balance to be achieved here.)

And one final word about the photography, before the pictures. I’m using a Nikon D3300 with either the kit lens (when the subject is relatively large), or a Tamron 90mm macro lens. The models are placed in a collapsible light box, and lit up using two LED lamps from the side. The whole contraption is in the kitchen, with fluorescent overall lightning, which explains the difficulties to actually getting the colors right on the photos- the camera, no matter how smart it is, is having trouble with the white balance. I did take some photos during the day using the same setup, and the sunlight as an overall source of illumination; the difference is visible. I will set the white balance manually next time. The other issue I dislike is that the figure looks a bit glossy; when you look at it in real life, it is much more matte.
It’s a learning curve of taking photos, and it’s also a matter of convenience. Living in London means I have absolutely no space dedicated for model building, so everything needs to be set up in the kitchen when I build/take photos. Not very convenient.

So without further ado, here’s the finished STALKER diorama:

Tamiya 1/35 T-62 with Verlinden damage set p3.

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The first part of this build can be found here.

Second part here.

With the major building and painting finished, it was time to put the tank into context. Well, into a scene, that is.

I buy large plastic cases to keep my models in; they are excellent for display, protection against dust and curious fingers, and also make it easy to transport the models. In some cases I use them as small dioramas.

In the second part the tank was reasonably finished, but it was still somewhat uniform, despite of the layers upon layers of paints, paintchips, oil paints, filters and pigments. Now was time to bring out the sponge…

The technique is reasonably simple: dab the sponge (or the scrotch brite) into the paint, dab most of it off on a piece of paper, and then keep dabbing it against the surface you wish to cover with paint/paintchips. (Depending on the amount you cover you can depict paint chips or flaking off paint.)

I’ve used the external fuel tanks to experiment; unfortunately the box was not long enough for these to be mounted onto the tank…

First, I’ve used the sponge technique to make the uniform brown surface into a rusting, multicolored one.

Second step: using light green I repeated the process. (This color is excellent for paint chips, too.) It’s not a problem if it’s too light at this stage; in fact, it’s actually necessary- the subsequent washes, filters will darken the color anyway.

And finally, the result: I’ve used overall brown washes, which created a grimy, used look. Some more green was dabbed onto the barrels in a much smaller area, and voila – we have an interesting, rusting surface with different shades and colors.

The tank was glued onto the base using two part epoxy (it’s quite heavy because of all the resin and metal), and then I used Tamiya’s soil Diorama Texture Paint. (I’ve got it discounted when the largest hobby store chain in the UK went bust a couple of years ago.) The color is not exactly great, but we’ll help it a bit later using the airbrush.

Using the sponge method I’ve added green patches onto the turret and the front part of the tank- I wanted to achieve a color difference between the front and the back.

The paint was toned down with some brown filters.

I’ve used the leftover tracklinks from the MiniArt T-54-1 for the tracks; a lot of them don’t have teeth, since they are the special links for the ice-cleats, and they are also narrower than should be, but to be honest I did not want to spend money on extra tracks. Nobody will notice, unless they read the text.

I’ve bought some AK Interactive products online cheap (six bottles for twenty quids) – rust, different colored streaking products, washes, and one that simulates algae streaking… so I used this tank to try them all.

I’ve used more rust pigments on the turret and the side of the hull, and used a dark brown filter to tone down the contrast a bit. Black pigment was used sparingly to depict soot (my fiancee’s insistence)¬† The way I use these pigments is to load a brush with Tamiya’s flat varnish, dab it into the pigments, dab most of it onto a piece of paper, and then dab it onto the surface of the model. You want to have some in the brush, but not too much; kind of like a heavy drybrush.

 

I’ve used some wine by Eduard to depict a creeper growing out of the driver’s compartment. The fallen leaves were made using the actual seed pod of a tree. Unfortunately I can’t figure out what it’s called; it looks like a fat caterpillar, and when you grind it up between your fingers, it falls apart into Marple-leaves like parts, and seeds. I mixed some white glue and water, added this plant material, and distributed onto the tank.

 

 

 

Last part is coming next week with the vegetation and the STALKER dude added

Making rust -using rust

Nothing looks more like rust, than, well, rust.

Back in the US I had a brilliant product: a two-part rust effect product. One flask had suspended iron particles, the other was an activator (an oxidizing reagent). You applied the metal suspension to the surface, and after it dried, you added the activator. After some days (or hours, depending on how much activator/iron you used) you got a very realistic rust effect. (It was rust, after all.) You could play around with different reagents to get different colors- after all any acid or hydrogen peroxide would work very well, and produce slightly different mixture of the different iron oxide variants. (Being in Florida, it was also a very viable option to simply leave the model out on the patio… the 100% humidity and high temperature was quite effective rusting anything, anyhow.)

The armor of my orc warrior was done using this method. (In this case the rust effect was used to depict a rotting leather armor; the same product was used on the ground as well to simulate dirt.)

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Modern Masters and Porters Paints have similar products, but they cost an arm and leg.

However, you can make your own rust pigments, and quite easily at that.

Simply use scratch brite (metal, of course). Put some steel wool or scratch brite into a cup, add vinegar or peroxide (or any acid of your choice), and stick it somewhere safe, where nobody will disturb it. Let it stand for a month or two, and wait for the liquid to evaporate. (If by the time it evaporates parts of the iron are still unoxidized, simply refill the cup.) You can even experiment: depending on the strength and nature of the oxidizing reagent you use, you will get a slightly different colored mixture of rust particles.

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The result will be a brown mess; if you break it up in a pestle you will have finely ground iron oxide, ready to be used. As the orc warrior has demonstrated the pigments have more uses than simply depict rust: they have a nice, brown range of colors which can be used in groundwork, deposits, etc. (Some of the rust I’ve made this was was used to simulate deposits collecting in the nooks and crevices of the T-62 wreck I’m building.)

Tamiya 1/35 T-62 with Verlinden damage set p2.

The first part of this build can be found here.

The tank needed to be burned out and rusty- something that stood abandoned (and looted) for years. I took a lot of liberties with the amount of rust and weathering -this degree of decomposition would only happen after decades. It’s an interesting point in our hobby: we tend to overemphasise the damage, the chipping, the rusting on most of the AFVs we build, which makes them interesting to look at, but quite unrealistic and out-of-scale. The point is: it’s not meant to be an exact replica of the real thing, it’s only a representation of an idea.

The idea here is a tank that had a catastrophic fire in the engine compartment, so it was abandoned in the Exclusion Zone around Chernobyl. (I wanted to use the STALKER figure, so it had to be Chernobyl. I could not come up with a realistic scenario why a T-62 would catch fire there, though, so you’ll have to use your imagination.)

Anyhow: after spraying on a base-coat of different rust colors, I proceeded to coat the tank with AK Interactive heavy chipping medium, and some NATO green from Tamiya. Once it was dry to the touch I created areas where the paint was worn off to differing degrees: more on the back and on the thinner metallic parts, and less on the front, where the fire did not heat the hull up that much.

Once the chips were done I sealed everything with varnish.

I put the tank onto the base of the display case I intended to use and realized that it was too long for the external fuel tanks to be mounted… I could have turned the turret around if I had not used epoxy glue to stick it onto the hull… Oh well, more battle damage.

I’ve used ochre and dark brown filters on the whole of the vehicle, and some burned umber washes to deepen the shadows in the crevices.

I’ve glued the tank onto the base using epoxy glue, and mixed some sand with plaster to create a rudimentary terrain; this will -hopefully- be refined further. (As soon as I get some replacement tracks for the tank, of course.)

While we’re waiting for the groundwork to be finished, I went on to further enhance the rusty feel for the tank: I used three different colors of iron oxide (it comes in brown, red and yellow, and dabbed it on using a brush and some flat varnish.

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I’ve also tried Lifecolor’s rust wash set to see how it works; I suspect an airbrush would be a better way of handling it. (It is not easy to use. Well, it’s easy to use, what’s not easy is to get results like you see on the cover. Unfortunately there’s no real guide provided.)
They suggest glossy surface, however it tends to form droplets which is not ideal. (Surface tension is not always useful.)

I’ve checked out the storage box on a museum Shilka, and it was pretty much pure rust… so this is how the tool boxes will look once I’m done with it.

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Some more rust over the burned areas will also be necessary, and also soot. It’s a good question how much soot actually remains after years of being subjected to the elements, but this will not deter me from adding some. In fact I’ve long been wanting to add white soot left over from the burning rubber rims of the roadwheels. I’m fairly certain this would be washed away by the rain in a short order in real life, but I shall not pay attention to this issue.

Anyhow, this is how it is as of now. Keep tuned in; updates will be coming (soonish).

Tamiya 1/35 T-62 with Verlinden damage set

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For the last post of the year: the Tamiya T-62 and the Verlinden set that comes with it.

It’s old shelf-queen as well… sitting in a box since 2004. Time to finish her royal highness. (Or, as it turned out later, a royal pain in the neck.)

I did not have any concept for this build, until I finally got that elusive STALKER figure I’ve been searching for for the last seven years. (This was an object lesson: even though you are buying stuff you don’t need, hence increasing the stash you have in your closet, certain things, like resin models are a must-buy when they are available. Once they become out of production, you’ll end up trying to snatch them up on Ebay, and beg on online forums if anyone has a leftover set somewhere.) Bringing these two together I have decided to do a STALKER style diorama with a burned-out, rusting tank. I’m not entirely sure what destroyed the tank; a catastrophic explosion was one option, since the Verlinden set allowed it (theoretically), but for reasons listed below I went with the simple “burned out engine compartment and abandoned” tank instead. One of the reasons was the lack of heavy fighting in the Chernobyl exclusion zone that would cause a tank to explode. The other, less glamorous reason was the difficulty of inserting the resin turret ring into the Tamiya upper hull…

This Verlinden set caught my attention way back in 2004, when my focus shifted towards armored vehicles. Back in those days, children, you could actually buy stuff on ebay from other people, as it was not the exclusive playground of professional vendors. That was a long, long time ago. You could even buy cheap models back in those good ole’ days from fellow modellers! (I know, heresy.)

Anyhow, I really wanted this Verlinden conversion; after all, it featured the interior of the T-62, it was full of metal and resin; what can go wrong, right?

Little did I know. I should have suspected something was awry when an American gentleman essentially threw this kit at me- I got it for less than 10 dollars (with shipping). Ten dollars of PE and resin; quite a lot of it, actually.

What you do not get a lot of, however, is the instructions…

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There was a very quick reality check that I should set my sights lower than this diorama. One prominent issue is the disparity in skills, the other is, well, the conversion/base kit itself.

There are several problems with the Tamiya kit- it’s an old, motorized, inaccurate model, and quite simple at that. The Verlinden set looks incredible- but has the same inaccurate turret, and, quite frankly, takes superhuman efforts to assemble. The instructions were abysmal, the gun barrel was 90 degrees bent, the fit in cases was horrible; after a while I just threw the towel in, and decided to use whatever I can, leave out everything else. I also decided early on against trying to be accurate… So yeah; this model is not going to satisfy any rivet counting tendencies you or I might be harbouring. Let’s just say it’s an “impression” of a T-62 rusting on the field.

Now, don’t get me wrong: I’m not trying to belittle this conversion set. I will constantly bitch and moan about the difficulties that I ran into, but I think it is useful to be aware of them if you decide to pick this set up. Never once I felt frustrated during the building state; I accepted that if something does not fit or makes sense, I just move on, and ignore the problem. It is incredible set, but you really, really need to be good and extremely dedicated to bring out most of it. It was a learning process for me. I realized what I always knew: I do not like to spend time on challenging builds that are challenging due to poor instructions, poor alignment, and fit. I thoroughly enjoyed MiniArt’s D7 dozer, even though it was a difficult kit. It was a challenge in complexity, and not bad engineering. I never felt I was suffering because the designer wanted to throw a curveball at me, or did not think something through, so I did not mind the effort I put into it. In this case I just simply gave up on a lot of things. Someone who has better skills and more patient can bring out much more of this kit than I can.

That being said… one thing that really, really irked me about the instructions was the frontal mudguard. It shown the original Tamiya part with the plastic mudguard left on when it described what to cut off, and never once indicated that PE replacements are provided. It took me quite a long time to actually realize that it can be changed to a metal one, but by that time the hull was assembled. Beh. The other big issue was the fit of the engine compartment. You need to saw off the back of the hull (it was quite an intense few minutes to get myself going with the saw), and the engine compartment/back hull needs to be glued to the original plastic one. Well, it’s a couple of millimetres wider.

As glue I mostly used epoxy glue, because it is stronger than cyanoacrylate; and I used green stuff as putty to increase the strength of the bond even more.

The mudguards were attached with superglue first, then reinforced with epoxy glue; they are very stiff, and hard to bend. (I did some “battle damage” using a cutter, and it took me considerable effort to cut and bend the metal. Not sure what would cause damage like this in this particular case, but I always wanted to try it, and here was the perfect opportunity.) Same with the tool boxes: the tops were bent and damaged.

 

The interior has some issues as well: the back firewall is missing, and it’s quite visible even if you peek through the hatches; same with the driver’s compartments’ floor. I’ve used some Evergreen plastic to fill these areas out.

I’ve left several parts of the transmission out -so that the rest can be visible, and added some fuel lines to the engine. The exhaust pipes are made out of PE which is odd.

 

 

I thought about depicting a tank that exploded and threw the turret off; the plans, however, died in their infancy. For one, the Tamiya hull had to be cut so that it could accommodate the resin turret ring. I did not feel the resolve to start cutting a large, circular hole. I did not wish to invest in the necessary tools, and doing it free-hand… well, that’s above my skills.

The other main problem was the confusing turret interior layout. The instructions are horrible showing what goes where, and not many people have built and posted photos of this set, so I could not find good reference photos, either. Now, I could have researched the interior of the T-62 using the few black and white photos, and then painstakingly recreate it, but I have shrunk from this challenge.

The turret stays on. I added the gun (but left off most of the components of the gun), bought an aluminium gun barrel (as I did not wish to depict a tank that can only fight in the corners due to the 90 degree bend in its gun), and called it a day.

As for the gun. Normally burned-out tanks have their gun sagging down, as most of the mechanisms holding it in balance are destroyed during the fire. Well, the incorrectly shaped, shallow Verlinden turret and the massive gun breach actually guarantees that the tank does not have any room to depress its gun. In fact it cannot even keep it level- it has a quite steep elevation. In other words this T-62 can only shoot at the stars, because sure as hell it would not be able to depress its gun at anything lower than the sky.

The different vision ports, etc, were also a bit problematic to fit into/onto the turret- the holes were generally larger than the parts themselves. A bit annoying, really. The last problem with the turret: the Tamiya hatches. Russian tanks have quite an elaborate interior hatch structure, which are not replicated on the Tamiya model; I was not sure how it was supposed to be depicted using the Verlinden set. (No instructions, remember?) After a little thinking I just glued the seat pads onto them, so they look like a traditional, WWII hatch with padding. I know it’s not accurate, but as I said: I realized I need to compromise if I want to finish this kit in this century.

I’ve decided -again- not to bother trying to assemble the machine gun from the 30 odd resin and PE pieces, or use Tamiya’s plastic one- after all, the weapons would probably be removed from the abandoned vehicle. Same with most of the storage boxes and tools.

The roadwheels provided by Verlinden have a nice burned-look (no rubber left), but the holes are actually solid. I’ve opted not to open them up; time and sanity saving measures. With a rotary tool it would be reasonably fast, but I don’t have one in the UK, and it’s not very healthy to work with resin dust, anyhow. Talking about roadwheels… I wanted to reposition the swing arms for the suspension, but it was almost impossible to simply cut them off the hull; Tamiya made sure they are very solidly attached to the lower hull. This is important because torsion bars would lose their flexibility once the fire weakens them, and the whole tank would just “sit” on the ground. Well, this one will not.

Painting was done in several steps. First, to check for seams I painted the whole of the bottom hull with different shades of rust- this was also to be a nice base layer for chipping.

Once I was satisfied with everything came the interior- using hairspray technique. AK’s Heavy Chipping fluid and Tamiya’s white were chosen. Once I was satisfied with the amount of chipping, I waited a day and sealed the paint with some varnish. I used some oil washes to do filters and some streaking, but overall I was not unduly worried about the interior, since I decided by that point that it will not be open to the elements. I did add some leaves and some dirt, though.

 

 

Once I tried the top of the hull on I realized that about 0.5cm of the interior’s walls are on the top- and they were not painted and weathered. So back to the rust/white chipping. Unfortunately they do not look uniform. (Apart from the seam between the upper and lower hull, there are color differences.)

 

Well, this is where we are now. The assembly is essentially over, and now it’s “just” the painting and weathering. It’s going to be quite a learning process; the first ever rusted tank I’m building. Keep tuned in- it’s going to be an interesting ride.

Chipping techniques- washable paints, hairspray and Windex chipping

I was curious how some chipping methods compare, so I did some experiments. Since the old hairspray I used ran out, and I could not get a similar product, I switched to the AK chipping fluid. (Not all hairsprays are the same when it comes to chipping; if you find something that works, stick to it.)

I also wanted to see how the Windex chipping technique works, and what the Mig Ammo washable white paint does. It’s not a comprehensive tutorial by any means, but I hope others find it useful.

Hairspray technique

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There’s a nice summary of the hairspray technique on another blog, so I won’t be taking up much space with it. It essentially works by forming a water soluble layer between two paint layers, which makes a chipping effect once¬†water is applied and slightly macerated with a stiff brush or toothpick. It can be applied to simulate paint chips or worn white wash; I used white in this case. With the AK Interactive product there’s a time factor: the earlier you do the chipping after the paint is dried, the larger the chips are; the longer you wait, the more difficult it becomes to remove the top layer. This can be used for your advantage, as it also allows you to use it in conjunction with the Windex chipping technique.

Windex chipping

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This is something relatively new. I’ve read about it in the Single Model series (02) by Rinaldi Studio Press. This technique depends on the fact that ammonia dissolves Tamiya (and supposedly similar acrylic) paints. You essentially dissolve the top layer with a 1-3% ammonia solution. (Windex and similar cleaning products contain ammonia; you can even buy ammonia by itself, and it would work just as fine.) The higher the ammonia concentration, the easier you remove the top paint layer, so it’s worth being patient and using less concentrated solutions. I used to use Windex as a solvent and airbrush cleaner; it seems like it’s great for chips as well. The effect is much more subtle than the hairspray technique’s: it produces smaller chips, and the effect is more like rubbed-off paint.

Mig Ammo washable white

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It’s essentially a white paint that can be spray painted and then washed off after drying. It does not form chips as it is; it’s more like a whitish translucent overcoat. The paint should not be diluted much (one or two drops of water, tops), as it would spray very dilute. (It took a while to figure out why it behaves like a wash when I sprayed it… The Lowe I did was the test piece, and I had to try three times before I realized I needed to keep the dilution low. It’s quite thick, so some dilution is necessary, but not much.) I’m not sure it stays washable after a prolonged period of time; it probably does.

Onto the test…

So I prepared my trusty Pnz IV mudguards with a green layer of paint, and sealed it with Dullcote. (So that it protects the paint from the ammonia.) The next layer was Tamiya’s flat white.

I divided up the segments, and got working. (I forgot to take a photo before I started to work on the AK Interactive chipping fluid. Imagine it white.)

AK Interactive Chipping fluid

I used a wet brush on the surface, and then gently a toothpick to nick the surface. The nicks were enlarged with a large, relatively stiff wet brush.

The resulting chips are giving a stark contrast between the white and the underlying green.

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Mig Ammo Washable White

The paint is very thick and kind of shiny once on the surface (you can see this on the photo). After a little drying period, I used a wet brush with a downward motion to remove the paint. It got dissolved, and smeared over the surface. The residual paint formed an uneven layer over the green paint, making the surface look worn. No chips, but realistic worn effect.

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The Windex Chipping method

I prepared a ~2% Ammonia solution using a kitchen cleaning product, and used a brush to wet the surface with it. I waited a minute or two and then gently rubbed the brush against the surface. For a long time nothing seemed to happen, but after a while I got a very nice, realistic chipping effect. It’s an important thing to point out: the effect is very gradual; for a while it really does look like nothing is happening. Some foam appears, but that’s it. Don’t push the brush down (now I’m rapping about modelling), as it might lift up the base layer as well.

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You can see the same technique used to recreate rust on the electric mule I built not long ago. The square parts are about 0.5cm long. Unfortunately the photo is not the best (the most interesting part is out of focus), but the effect can still be judged: tiny, minuscule chips and general look of wear-and-tear. Pretty good, I’d say.

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AK Interactive Chipping fluid and Windex combined

The fourth section was first treated with the AK Interactive chipping fluid, did the chips, then waited a couple of days. (It was probably close to a week, if I recall correctly.) The next step was to use the Windex method on the same section, forming smaller chips. The effects are subtle next to the large chips, but you can see how the paint rubbed off the edges and other areas sticking out. It also formed very tiny little chips between the larger ones, making the effect a bit more realistic. The Windex effects complements the larger chips of the previous method quite nicely. Due to dissolving the white color, it also deposited some on the green undercoat, making the contrast less pronounced in some areas. (Not all and not evenly.)

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So there is it.

I think the washable paint looks good as a very worn winter whitewash on its own. If you use hairspray chipping for whitewash it would also be very useful to tone down the stark contrast between the underlying paint and the white on top.

The Windex method is great for subtle chips, but it also complements the larger hairspray chipping.

This, of course, is not limited to whitewashes; excellent chips can be done using a rust undercolor, or even a variation of the main color. (Green on green chips, camo pattern chips, etc.) Your imagination is the limit.

There are more than one ways to skin a cat, so these are not the definitive methods; there are other ones as well. AK Interactive just came out with a solution that makes any acrylic paint washable; the this opens up a large potential of uses from dust to worn paint. I have ordered it, so when I have some time I’ll see what it can do, and post the results.

 

 

(Here’s an imgur album for the photos- they are hopefully larger than the wordpress versions.)

Playing around with Lifecolor’s Liquid Pigments – Rust Wizard Review

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I do some experiments on techniques or modelling products now on then; I might as well share them here. Here’s the previous post about the different media you can suspend your pigments.

 

I saw these new products mentioned in armorama, and they did look interesting. While I tend to avoid paint/weathering sets, I thought I’d give it a go, since rust is something that is difficult to do, and new methods are always welcome.

I’ve been experimenting with this product for a while now, and here are my thoughts about it.

One thing that is very important is to apply the product to a flat (matte) surface (as in flat paint, although a level surface does not hurt, either). It flows quite freely, and if the surface is a little bit satin it will just flow into the recesses as an ordinary wash would do. This in itself can give you a nice rusty effect, but this is not what we’re looking to achieve here. So: always use it on a flat surface. (Unless you DO want a rust-wash; this is a perfectly good use of this product.)

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Most of the paint flows into the crevices even on a semi-matte surface like this

The standard Tamiya paint is perfect base to use it on, since it is very flat, however the remover solution that comes with the set does seem to attack the paintcoat. If you plan to use the remover, use a very, very, very flat enamel based varnish. Testors Dullcote is just not flat enough in my experience.

Patience is important using this product: you have to wait until the subsequent colors dry, otherwise they just mix into one rust tone. While this is only slightly annoying with brush application, I have to say I would not consider using an airbrush if I want to apply it in several coats. It’s a major pain in the neck setting up everything every hour or so for a one minute spray session, so I think I’ll stick to the brush application for now. I have to say, though, it does spray on very nicely, and you can do some very nice shading with this product.

I ended up applying the pigments starting with the¬†lighter and brighter colors and finishing with the¬†darker colors. Most cases when you have a rusty surface, the darker colors dominate, and you only see patches of bright rust. This order you ensure that only small amount of the yellowish rust will show, and hopefully it’ll result in a more realistic surface. There’s nothing stopping you applying the lighter¬†colors (yellows and oranges) with a detail brush after you applied the base, dark rust color, it’s only my take on this.

The remover does remove the washes after they dried; it really works. (I was a bit curious as the wash dries into a pretty resilient layer.) If you want to selectively remove layers of the pigments, you have to seal the surface with varnish after the individual steps.

 

 

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Still wet after application. Lots of tide marks, not very pretty. Most of the contrast disappears with drying, and there are no tide-marks left.
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Same piece after drying- the transitions are not that stark any more
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Second color applied- simply dabbed on with a brush.
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Third color, same method. The idea was to show more of the dark rust colors, and have the brighter ones only “shine through” at the edges
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The fourth rust color added.
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Same method applied to the other end of the plastic part
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A brush with the remover solution was used to gently rub off/ blend the rust colors. As you can see it did remove even the base Tamiya paint. (The effect is not bad, though, but it’s worth keeping in mind

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The complete sprue: the left one had the pigments applied using an airbrush, the right one we used a brush. Both had been worked with the remover solution

Conclusion?

Well, it’s mixed. I prefer the whole “do it yourself” school of modelling, so my opinion is a bit colored by this. (I do use products that work much better or simplify things greatly; but I tend to avoid sets that are aimed at specific models… like DAK weathering sets, or 1941 German Uniform Color Modulation Sets.)
Anyhow. This product is essentially pigments suspended in a carrier medium. They are very fine, so you can use an airbrush to apply them. This is definitely a plus. It is water based, so no nasty chemicals there; it’s another great thing about it. On the other hand they don’t really provide you with a magic bullet to produce a heavily rusted tank. It essentially cannot do anything you could not do with some dry pigments, and oil paints.

MiniArt T-44 part.6 Finished at last

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Well, this has been a journey.

As a last step (well, series of steps) I added mud and dust to the tank. I did not want to make it look extremely muddy -probably not very realistic, and certainly not very appealing to the eyes. (Well, it’s a personal opinion.)

The other reason is that I’m not good with mud. I know. It’s horrible, but there you go: as far as mud goes I’m a noobie.

I’ll detail the process of mud-making, but unfortunately I have not made photos of the stages.

As a first step I mixed up earth colored pigments (from a railway model supply company), static grass and plaster in equal amounts. I added some water, and used this mixture  on the wheels, the mudguards, and the lower part of the chassis.

(Instead of water you can use white spirit, enamel thinner or even earth colored enamel/acrylic paints, or other products. I think. I’ll experiment with these.) I also used the thinner part of this mixture to create splashes on top and on the side of the chassis.

All looked well until it dried… due to the plaster the color shifted to a much lighter complexion. (You can see it on the photos that show the splashes near the driver’s hatch.)

Well, I did not get a heart attack despite of this; the review for Armorama was finished, so I was free to experiment.

I took a stiff brush, and started rubbing some of the mud mixture off on the sloping front and on the back; it made it look like it was washed off over time. So far so good.

The color issue I solved with burned umber washes (this color is the best friend of every model builder…). I dabbed a loaded brush on the lower parts, and let the capillary action draw the paint upwards. Repeated a couple of times, and the results are not half bad: the top is still faded, light color, representing very dry mud; while it gets darker to the bottom, representing the still wet, fresher mud. The fact that the wash and the original mud application left some “tide marks” actually works in my favor now -it looks pretty damn authentic. Real mud leaves these marks as it dries, too. I successfully turned a lemon into lemonade I think. (The application was more of an experimental one -let’s see if it works- rather than a conscientious application of skills…)

I did the same with the wheels. The static grass gives a nice volume, and some hint for vegetation caught up in the mud; I have to say I’m pleased how it turned out, and feel pretty silly for not using this before. (I bought the static grass back in the US in 2008… It spent some time in my mother’s attic since then, but still. It is a very useful addition for any modeller’s toolset.)

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The exhaust was treated with rust colored pigments mixed in enamel thinner. Once it tried different dark washes were added: simply loaded the brush and dabbed it onto the surface at random. The capillary action did the rest, creatinga nice-looking rusted look.

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The strap for the fuel tank was re-glued after the photo session

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I’ve used light brown pigments on top of the turret and the chassis both dry (just dabbed on with a brush), and mixed with enamel thinner. In this case I used a clean brush to carefully blend in the spots. Some remained a tad darker -as if it was still wet a bit. The reasons I’m not sure about yet, but it does kind of look good, so I’ll take it. Again: the result of a happy accident. (Perhaps I should have said it was pure skill… next time.)

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Parts of the tank were rubbed with dark steel pigment giving them a metallic shine. zyr6yyreszhgqr

For oil and fuel stains I used AK Interactive’s engine oil and fuel stain products. (I try to mix most of my stuff, but some are really useful.) First I created a very diluted solution, and made larger spots. Once dry I used a less diluted solution in the middle.This, with the dust layer underneath makes it look pretty good I think. (Second try on these products; and the first try I diluted them… The first try was not as convincing.)

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Oh, the engine. Let’s not forget about the engine. I’m planning to display it just as I did with the T-34/85 – in front of the tank.

The engine block received the same bluish base color as the interior (I’m fairly certain the engine was bare metal, but I liked the color). The top was painted anthracite, and was rubbed with dark steel pigment -it gave it a nice, metallic sheen. (The same effect can be achieved with ground up graphite.)

The exhaust pipes were first painted with anthracite, same as the engineblock’s top. I mixed rust colored pigments with enamel thinner, and used this mixture to add a basic rust color and some texture to them. I’ve used soldering wire for the wiring. I’ve seen some amazing works which shows the ignition wires yellow, but watching this video of an ISU-152 I think it’s safe to go with silver.wwpg9nr

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Well, here it is. The deed is done. I need to attach the antenna, and mount it in a display box. Just in time for the MiniArt SU-122 with complete interior and the T-44M I’m reviewing… Keep tuned in; I have several interesting models from MiniArt and OKB to review.