Tag Archives: markgraf

ICM 1/350 Markgraf part 2

In the first part I reached a stage when I could make a diorama, something like the sunken Hindenburg, and call it a day…

This would be an interesting diorama idea, however, I have a ship to review. So I went on to working on the turrets.

I cut away the same length of plastic from the kit barrels as the metal barrels were, and I fixed the metal barrels onto the resulting stump. Carefully filed away the moulded-on ladder detail from the turrets, and used PE instead. The bases of the turrets also were a bit improved with PE replacement ladders. The turrets remain movable, however they do not fit snugly, and there’s a little play in the movement; I think I will glue them in place once I decide on their position on the model.

I also built the boats; they are fine as they are, but the PE set provides some serious improvement. (Rudders, oars, propellers, railings…)

 

Due to the peculiarities of battleship building, you build and paint in sub-assemblies. Now I need to paint… which requires me to set a big chunk of time aside. Until then the ship building is suspended.

(The next steps will be the painting of the decks, the hull, and the superstructure. Once that is done, I have to add the small details, the boats. the boarding ladders, the railings, etc, and paint a lot of this by hand… I think armor will stay my favorite subject.)

ICM 1/350 Markgraf part 1… opening the box and starting the build

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ICM has sent me their 1/350 Markgraf kit for a review… so here it is – the build itself. Once done I will submit it to Modelshipwrights as an article with more information, photos of the sprues and a lot of research. Ships last a long time, so they undergo several rounds of refits, renovations and repairs –  if you want absolute accuracy, you have to do a lot of research. Fortunately WWI German battleships have not much information available, and even that is often contradictory. I say fortunately because this allows me for some leeway while building… I did a lot of reading, but ultimately I build for fun, not for absolute and total historical accuracy. (I have had enough of the two Panthers for now. I will go on with the builds, but I felt increasingly like the RFM one was fighting me. The Takom needs to be cut up for a cutaway, and it that is also a major source of stress.)

Since PE is necessary I also review  (and use) two sets. One is Tom’s Modelworks, and it’s pretty basic, the other is the GMM set.

The model itself is surprisingly simple, but well detailed; a lot of surface detail is so fine it takes a while to actually notice it, but it’s all there: hatches, portholes, covers, everything. I wonder how this will look after painting and washes.

I started with the superstructure and funnels. Since I decided to try my hands on rigging, the kit masts are too thin and weak; I replaced the thinner parts with brass rods (Trumpeter sells sets which are useful if you need brass rods in various thickness.)

While the kit is nice, it really is in a need of upgrade: the funnel grilles, the hatches, the ladders and staircases are all in dire need of replacement. Now I have something that looks like a half-sunk ship.

Interestingly the TM grilles are very much different from the GMM ones: the GMM grilles are very simple affairs, and I think they might be incorrect (although I found no photos of the actual ship, only models done by others…). I used the TM ones based on personal preference.

The nature of ship models is such that you need to do sub-assemblies separately: assemble, paint and weather everything, and then put them together.

The superstructure came together really nice. The columns holding the different platform are supposed to go through very fine holes, and the fit is so nice, they actually work. You have to be very attentive because the instructions are not very clear about which holes they should be going through. (The tiny holes sometimes are covered by flash, so observe the parts carefully, and you will be fine.) You can also replace these parts with brass rods, but I found it unnecessary – and I wanted to use as many kit parts as possible. All in all, the detail is great, especially with the PE improvements. The detail on the headlights is quite basic, but in this scale they look fine.

There were some fit issues as can be seen on the white putty; nothing major came up.

One word of advice: the splinter shields on the small platforms were all-chain railings pre-1917, and were later replaced with the solid splinter shields -but not on the aft funnel’s decks… Which I did not realized while building. Now it would be a bit difficult to change them, so they will stay like that. (And the PE railings will stay on the sprue.)

This -and the fact that I do not like the look of the anti-torpedo netting- decided that I will build the ship in a post-Jutland configuration.

More coming up later: turrets and the rest of the small details.