Tag Archives: interior

Amusing Hobby 1/35 Ferdinand with interior part 5.1 Finishing the build

Well, finishing up the build… The previous installments:

Part 1.

Part 2.

Part 3.

Part 4.

Part 5.

OK, now it is ready to be painted. Personally I blame the holidays for the lack of progress.

Amusing Hobby 1/35 Ferdinand with interior part 5. Finishing the build

Well, finishing up the build… The previous installments:

Part 1.

Part 2.

Part 3.

Part 4.

So, further difficulties… although not big ones.

The periscopes do not fit into their slots -neither on the driver’s hatch, nor on the top of the vehicle. Bummer.

The mantlet (part number A8) of the gun barrel did not fit into place, either; I trimmed about a mm off from the end to be able to slot it into place.

Because the gun is set off-set, and not centered (I had the bright idea to display it off-centered… talk about self-goals), I can’t fit the roof of the fighting compartment into place. The gunsight gets in the way, unfortunately. I strongly suggest centering the gun, or leave the hatches open so that the gunsight can stick out of the tank. I will have to figure something out; maybe display it lifted.

The tank is essentially done apart from the tow cables and a few minor parts. I will glue the fenders in place once I installed the tracks, and call it a day. I am still unsure about what tracks to use as I am not happy with either options, but I would like to stress something. None of these issues are deal-breaking – the model went together rather well. It is quite a spectacular-looking model, and considering that it comes with a full interior it was not a tour de force to build it. I do confess my love to the MiniArt kits with interior, but a T-54 was a much, much more involved process. This model went together surprisingly quickly. The ease of building obviously does come with some compromise with regards to detail. The question obviously is how much detail you can live without. I am happy to say that this level I am fine with -milage may vary. I am sure there will be a 1kg Voyager update set with PE and resin for the people who wish for more. Perhaps an aftermarket set of tracks would be useful but otherwise I am fine with this model out of the box.

Now I just need to paint the thing.

Amusing Hobby 1/35 Ferdinand with interior part 4.

Well, finishing up the interior… The previous installments:

Part 1.

Part 2.

Part 3.

The interior was a surprisingly short affair, compared to RFM’s or Takom’s Panthers‘ (which may or may not be a good thing, depending on your point of view… right now I am happy it did not take years).

I cut the floor of the fighting compartment to show off half of the electric motor, and the assorted parts; I also did a cut on the panel holding the gun, but still very little can be seen of the engines. I actually took one of them out to display it separately.

The superstructure was finished (a few bits and pieces are missing still) and weathered with AK’s interior wash, oils, chipping done with brush and sponge, and some AK rust pencils.

One issue with the decals: there are no stencils for the interior or the ammunition. It is important in this case since you can see the bottom of the rounds from above. I used RFM’s decals for the Panther ammo to depict the primer. It does improve the overall look of the model.

Based on the few photos available on the driver’s compartment it does not seem to be completely accurate, but it is easy to work with if you want to.

I also ran into the first fit issues…

  1. The horizontal cover of the driving comparment, D2, (where the extra tracklinks are stored is too long. It needs to be filed down so it actually fits inside the hull. I did not remove enough so now it is bent… I think I will install the spare tracklinks after all to hide this shameful fact. (It was not clear when I glued it in place. The frontal part is straight as I had it pressed flat in its place – the back part, however, stayed bent.
  2. At step 33 the assembly of the air filters (those strange flower-like things on both sides of the gun) should not be done in the suggested order. The instructions would have you put the whole filter assembly together, and then install them in place. You should first glue the individual holding legs into place, and then add the top of the filters with the canisters installed.
  3. E18, the panel that holds the gun, and the top of the engines do not have enough clearance… The engines are a mm or so too high, and will not let the panel settle into its place.
  4. The superstructure has a very tight fit… I had to remove the gun, in order to be able to glue the top of the superstructure on -which obviously created fit issues with the gun later on. The gun was heavily modified: I cut off the pin that would keep it in place because once the superstructure is on, it cannot be inserted into the hole on the floor, and the gun shield was thinned somewhat. This allowed me to squeze the gun into place. Since I did not want it to be boring, I made it a slight off-center as if it was aiming at something.
  5. Part D5 (some sort of engine hatch) is too wide to fit between the superstructure and the engine deck. I had to sand it a bit off.
  6. Part J35 should be labelled B35…
  7. I am seriously considering using the flexible, rubber band tracks…

Amusing Hobby 1/35 Ferdinand with interior part 3.

Building and painting as I go. I used AK’s French blue for the greyish/blueish parts, and a black thread for the V belt on the engine. (And lots of rust on the exhausts…)

Touching it up here and there: some red is added to to some fine details to make them pop; it will be a shame to cover it up. I think I will cut the crew compartment’s floor in half to show off what is underneath.

Tiger Model 1/35 AML-90 Part 3. All is Dust

 

Part 1.

Part 2.

 

Magnus did nothing wrong, as we know. So dusting it up. I used AK Interactive’s Dust Effects as a base. The tutorial on the AK website is OK(ish) – the usual trick applies: you add the product, wait until it dries to the touch, and adjust it with a wet (using turpentine) brush.

The results are OK, but not good enough – the single tone and the texture alone does not work perfectly. However, as with all effects you need layers and different tones, so it is not exactly a surprise. I looked around my shelf, and took all the acrylic dust products I could find, and went working on the model.

Most of these products could be adjusted and re-adjusted with one prominent exception: once the Vallejo rain marks product hits the surface you have very little time to adjust the effect. (I had to mask the marks on the turret using pigments.)

I will do a short tutorial about the acrylic pencils; the trick is to swamp the surface with water, rub the pencils on, wait until the mess is dry, and then you can adjust with a wet brush, creating puddles, streaks and spots. Rinse and repeat. Or rather, do not rinse, just keep adjusting, maybe adding more pigments.

I am starting to feel quite good about dust; if I have a chance I would like to give Lifecolor’s liquid pigments a try, but these tools are perfectly sufficient to achieve good results.

I wrote a review of this model on Armorama as well… as you can see it has been published quite a long time ago, but the weekly publication schedule caused a considerable slip. (Hence the extra post this week. I want to get it out of the way… Still have ICM’s Leichttractor to do.)

Amusing Hobby 1/35 Ferdinand with interior part 2.

Well, keep going with the interior of the lower hull. The assembly was a joy; most parts are simply dry fitted during painting as they fit really well, and slot into their respective places. Part one went well, part two continues this trend.

I gave a few, subsequently lightening coats of AK’s dunkelgelb to the bottom, and started with the ivory interior color (also AK, then misted over with MRP’s paint to lighten it on the top), using the bottom of the crew compartment as a mask (also some masking tape for the other areas not covered by it.

The gun needs some filler. Which is a bummer.

The suspension is an unique torsion bar system, which is reproduced by Amusing Hobby -at least now I know how it is supposed to work.

Does it work? Kind of.

It is very well designed, but the metal springs/torsion bars are not very strong. The metal springs have a slot on the hull which produces the tension; it is not very difficult to install them. (First I thought the metal wire hanging out of the suspension units are leftovers, but no; they do have a role.) Some of the units do have a “spring” to it, but most are quite flaccid. It does move, though.

Onto painting details – that is the topic of the next post.

Tiger Model 1/35 AML-90 Part 2. final assembly and painting

Part 1.

The model comes with a very well designed instruction booklet, and a colored page showing the camouflage patterns as a painting guide. The parts are well-moulded, the detail is crisp and fine, and I found no flash anywhere – it is a very high tech plastic model. There are valves, tiny nuts and all sorts of small details present on the model that you actually need a magnifying glass for. All-in-all, it is just a great little model, with just enough parts not to make it an enormous undertaking to build. You get 7 sprues with a total of 266 parts, one of which has transparent parts, 5 vinyl tires, 2 small PE with a total of 19 parts, aluminium and a brass turned barrel for the main gun and the coaxial machine gun, four metal springs and a small decal sheet.

There is a minimal PE but not exactly overdone; the fit is good, and when I dry fitted the hull to see how it holds up, it actually stayed together without glue. The detail both inside and out is good – when you open the hatches, there will be a lot of detail to see.

There is a great option of using either vinyl tires or plastic ones – as someone who does not like vinyl, I really, applaud the inclusion of hard plastic. There is also a metal barrel included for both the main gun and the coaxial machine gun, which is also very much welcome. The suspension has metal springs -they do not work, but they do look realistic. Everything is safely bagged, in color-coded bags for the springs to make the job of the builder simpler – the whole package is just geared for a pleasant building experience. (You can find photos of the sprues in this review: https://www.themodellingnews.com/2019/07/in-boxed-135th-panhard-aml-90-light.html?m=1)

The painting was done with silly putty: I left the Vallejo dark grey primer as black, and applied NATO green and brown in successive steps.

Amusing Hobby 1/35 Ferdinand with interior part 1.

 

I have seen the Tiger exhibition in Bovingdon, and there is an article on armorama worth reading.

I never really liked the way the Ferdinand looked- the Jagdpanther had a much sleeker outline. However, it was a very intruiging vehicle due to Ferdinand Porche’s unique solution for powering this monster.

There are only a few illustrations available of the interior of the tank:

There is, however, a book available if you fancy buying one (and understand German -although the photos alone would be enough I suspect).

Until now there was only one option for interior: Jaguar’s set, which only consisted of the fighting and the driving compartments -not the interesting (for me) parts.

It is well-worth watching the Tank Museum’s Tank Chat of this tank destroyer -although regrettably they did not climb into it.

Here are some photos I took of this vehicle.

Anyhow. I decided to start this model out of the stash. The model, in general, looks simple and easy to build, despite of the complex interior – a great news indeed after the previous tribulations. The part number is suprisingly low for a kit like this, which, after the RFM Panther, is definitely welcome news.. There are some annoying ejector pin marks, however. (See photos below.)

Things to keep in mind: painting and building are very interconnected. The instructions will not take into consideration the fact that several parts will be needed to be painted together, or just the opposite, need to be painted separately… I already made a couple of mistakes of gluing parts into place without thinking about how to paint them later on. This is a normal thing with all the complex models; it is up to the modeller to modify the sequence as they see fit.

The decals leave something to desire: there are no decals for the interior or the ammunition. I suspect I will just use Verlinden’s interior set, and the leftovers from the RFM/Takom Panthers for the ammunition -whomever can read the stencils can complain they are not correct for 88mm.

The engines do not have V-belts; they can be added with very little effort. If you want to do so, here is a good page for reference.

I really like that Amusing Hobby offered an alternative for tracks: either individual track links, or if you can’t be bothered with the tedium of assembly, a flexible rubber-band-like option. There is a jig provided for assembly but it is not that easy to make the tracks workable. The point of contact between the track links is really tiny, and it is very easy to get glue where it should not be,

Interior overall has a good fit, and it is well designed; so far I am really happy with the model. The fit is so good some parts are held in place firmly without glue. A lot of the parts on the photos are only dry-fit, not glued -except for those two cylinders behind the driving compartment, which I unfortunately glued in. They will need to be painted with a brush in situ.

Exciting news from Amusing Hobby – T-72M1 full interior kit

Perhaps I should have written the headline as: “If you want to know the next exciting news from Amusing Hobby, Click here.”

Or better yet: “Model makers are annoyed by this one trick of a single mother.”

But I am a more traditional headline-writer and I hate clickbait. So I am really happy to report that my Grail is being announced: a T-72 with full interior. I always wanted a model of the T-72 and T-64 because I am intruiged by their autoloader… and now we will have one.

Amazing.

Seriously, just look at it…

Just damn…

Now I really need to finish up that Ferdinand and the rest

Tiger Model 1/35 AML-90 Part 1.

A nice summary of the roles of the EBR, AML and the AMX-13 -since I have been building models of all three lately. If you want to buy an actual one for reference, then you can do that, too. There was also someone who scratch-built the interior– something definitely to be admired, but not for me.

The model comes in a box that resembles the 1:48 Tamiya kits -and this is a huge compliment. The packaging is great- parts are well protected, and even color coded with different bags to make identification easy. The detail is really good, without the excess part numbers some kits tend to come with.

The building phase -so far- was a joy; my only headache is the usual problem: how to display the gorgeous interior? Are the doors big enough to give an unobstructed view of the car, or should I start cutting parts away?

The age-old question; we will see what happens once I have some time to think about it properly. Any suggestions in the comment section are welcome!