Tag Archives: Hasegawa

Revell Panzer IV ausf H Flakpanzer 88 conversion

 

Image Source: Henk’s website henk.fox3000.com

I chose this vehicle as my first scratchbuild attempt. It looked relatively easy to do, it looked cheap(ish), and the tank, let’s face it, looks crazy. The Germans seemed to have a philosophy of “if we can stick an 88 on top of it, we’ll stick an 88 on top of it”, and they did. They put 88s on everything they could think of: trucks and halftracks mostly, but among others, on top of a PnzIV chassis as well. (The only reason they did not stick an 88 on top of another 88 is that it would have looked stupid even for them.) The vehicle looks wicked, but it’s easy to see this tank topple, should the gun fire in any other direction than straight forward or backward… It certainly does not seem like the most stable contraption. Perhaps this was one of the reasons they did not build more of this. The other reason was most likely the stress the gun put onto the suspension; after all, it was a heavy gun, and the recoil also was quite severe. (Don’t forget the ausf H version was already overstressing the chassis.)

Fortunately for us, Revell makes an excellent PnzIV ausf H, which I used as a base model, and I got a cheap(ish) 88 from Hasegawa to stick on top in the well-established German fashion. (I say cheapish, because for ten quid it’s not particularly good. I had to drill out the barrel, for one, and the detail is soft altogether.)

The first cut with a small razor saw… this is the point of no return. Unfortunately I have not made any more photos of the building process. In short, I successfully removed the extra bits (without completely destroying the rest), and glued evergreen cut to size to form the “fighting compartment” of the gun. I waited for months for this part, because I was desperately looking for appropriately sized no-slip surface PE sheets, but found none. I have managed to find one set, of course, right after I finished the model.

With this step, the conversion part was essentially over. (Babysteps. I’m happy with the first major scratchbuild I did. Next: BT-SV.)

From here on, everything was straightforward.

The photo shows two tanks patiently awaiting their first layer of paint: Citadel’s black primer.

The second color, dunkelgelb, in several light layers. The black acts as a pre-shade.

The first fitting of the gun onto the deck of the tank. The gun is still black; later it was painted German gray.

I wanted to give some contrast to the model, so I painted the added bits red-oxide color, as if the builders were too lazy to paint the converted parts. Most likely they would have painted over the primer on the metal to protect it, and to decrease the contrast -after all, anti-aircraft vehicles were prime targets for ground attack airplanes. They probably would have repainted the gun itself as well; I gave it a gray color, which was the original color used in AA batteries. I wanted to make it look like a conversion: they took a used chassis and a used gun, and mated them together. The gun is slightly elevated, and offset – it looks more dynamic this way. It’s a shame it’s not movable.

The tank received a moderate amount of wear and tear, some dust and rust; not too much, but I did want to make it look like a used tank. I added some paint chips around the hatches and edges using dark brown, and some lighter scratches using a lightened base color. A soft lead pencil was used to give a metallic shine to the edges. I added a lot of dust onto the fighting compartment; after all, there were at least 4 people manning the gun, and they won’t be wiping their boots before climbing up to their station. The wicker ammo holder was strategically placed onto the mudguard to cover up the holes… Filling them in would have been a major inconvenience, as it would have damaged the no-slip marks, and getting a PE replacement would have been expensive. (And frankly: I was pleased  with myself that it was not damaged at the cutting phase; I was not about to remove it after all that suffering.) I placed some empty shell casings around the gun to make it look a little bit more “lived in”, and called it a day. Later on I plan to add some more crew equipment (helmets, personal items, etc), but I’ll need to find a good aftermarket set first.

Hasegawa Karl-Gerät

The Germans had an obsession with enormous guns. Sturmtiger, Karl-Gerat, rail guns of all sorts – Dora especially, it seems like whomever was in charge for projects, he was overcompensating for something. They look awesome, they make for nice scale models, but that’s mostly it. Somehow the designers of these enormous weapons forgot one important thing the 20th century already taught by the time they were conceived: if you really need to kill a lot of people, it’s cheaper to do it using the air force. The sheer logistics required to set up and operate these weapons severely limited their usefulness in a fluid, dynamic battlefield. They were designed for a static siege warfare, and that was mostly a thing of the past. The Karl mortars saw service at Sevastopol, at Warsaw, and at the Battle of the Bulge, but in general, their impact was not exactly strategic.

The Karl line of self-propelled mortars were designed as siege weapons for the Maginot line. They were supposed to lob enormous projectiles onto the walls until they cracked, from a relatively safe distance. Because of the enormous recoil generated, these monsters actually had to be lowered to the ground, otherwise their torsion bars would have broken the first time they fired. They were also very, very, very slow. Slow to move, slow to fire. This is not really surprising, considering the projectile weighted as much as a small car. This meant they could not store their ammunition (or the separate propellants) on board. There were dedicated ammunition carriers converted from panzer IV’s, which were ferrying ammo from the supply dumps to these guns. There were seven of these guns built, and six of them had their own names. (Adam, Eva, Thor, Odin, Loki, Ziu: because nothing’s better than naming a tool of destruction after Adam and Eve; Thor and the other Norse gods at least are fitting.)

Hasegawa came out with two kits long, long time ago, depicting these weapons: one showing the mortar on a rail carriage (actually, hung up between the two dedicated carriages), and one in deployment with a carrier provided. Since the vehicle would be enormous in 1/35, I’ve chosen to do the 1/72 version. (Hobby Boss came out with its own Karls; they probably are really nice kits, but I have not had a chance to take a look at them.)

The Hasegawa offering is surprisingly good considering its age. You can choose between the original 60cm or the later long-barreled 54cm variants. As you can see, I’ve chosen the late-war 54cm mortar, since I’ve already built the DML 1/144 version of the same vehicle with the 60cm gun. You essentially get two models -the mortar and the ammo carrier-, and they both are very nice kits on their own right. It really was a joy to build them.

This was the first ever time I tried my airbrush. I used a dark brown primer (simple spray can), and as the first color of the 3 colored camouflage I layered sand on top.

The brown-green camo was done using silly putty as masking.

Once all the colors were on, I used brown filters to turn the sand color more like the German Dunkelgelb, and to blend the different colors together. Once all the camo colors were done, I installed the ammunition into the carrier. I used thread to simulate the metal cables for the winch, but I ran into some difficulties: the projectile carried in the arm of the winch was simply too light, so the thread was not stretched. It looked like it was holding a projectile-shaped balloon, and not a 2000kg projectile. I cut away the bottom of the projectile, and stuffed as much fishing lead into the cavity as I could. I also pulled the thread tight, and applied glue to it to make it still. These two solutions together made a realistic-looking winch.

I used some heavily diluted burnt sienna as a pin-wash to bring out the small details, and some rust-colored scratches here and there. I did not want to take the weathering too far, as these guns were always very much maintained by their crew. The models were sprayed with some semi-matt varnish to protect the pain, and to give it a metallic shine. (After all we kind of expect painted metallic surfaces not to be completely dull, even though -in reality they mostly are.)

And there they are: a mixture of gray and brown pain oversprayed lightly onto the running gear and the lower chassis of the two vehicles to simulate dust, some use of a soft lead pencil to simulate worn metal, and I declared the models finished. (I don’t always use dry-brushing; sometimes you don’t need a stark contrast on the surface of a model.)