Tag Archives: armored car

Tiger Model 1/35 AML-90 Part 3. All is Dust

 

Part 1.

Part 2.

 

Magnus did nothing wrong, as we know. So dusting it up. I used AK Interactive’s Dust Effects as a base. The tutorial on the AK website is OK(ish) – the usual trick applies: you add the product, wait until it dries to the touch, and adjust it with a wet (using turpentine) brush.

The results are OK, but not good enough – the single tone and the texture alone does not work perfectly. However, as with all effects you need layers and different tones, so it is not exactly a surprise. I looked around my shelf, and took all the acrylic dust products I could find, and went working on the model.

Most of these products could be adjusted and re-adjusted with one prominent exception: once the Vallejo rain marks product hits the surface you have very little time to adjust the effect. (I had to mask the marks on the turret using pigments.)

I will do a short tutorial about the acrylic pencils; the trick is to swamp the surface with water, rub the pencils on, wait until the mess is dry, and then you can adjust with a wet brush, creating puddles, streaks and spots. Rinse and repeat. Or rather, do not rinse, just keep adjusting, maybe adding more pigments.

I am starting to feel quite good about dust; if I have a chance I would like to give Lifecolor’s liquid pigments a try, but these tools are perfectly sufficient to achieve good results.

I wrote a review of this model on Armorama as well… as you can see it has been published quite a long time ago, but the weekly publication schedule caused a considerable slip. (Hence the extra post this week. I want to get it out of the way… Still have ICM’s Leichttractor to do.)

Tiger Model 1/35 AML-90 Part 2. final assembly and painting

Part 1.

The model comes with a very well designed instruction booklet, and a colored page showing the camouflage patterns as a painting guide. The parts are well-moulded, the detail is crisp and fine, and I found no flash anywhere – it is a very high tech plastic model. There are valves, tiny nuts and all sorts of small details present on the model that you actually need a magnifying glass for. All-in-all, it is just a great little model, with just enough parts not to make it an enormous undertaking to build. You get 7 sprues with a total of 266 parts, one of which has transparent parts, 5 vinyl tires, 2 small PE with a total of 19 parts, aluminium and a brass turned barrel for the main gun and the coaxial machine gun, four metal springs and a small decal sheet.

There is a minimal PE but not exactly overdone; the fit is good, and when I dry fitted the hull to see how it holds up, it actually stayed together without glue. The detail both inside and out is good – when you open the hatches, there will be a lot of detail to see.

There is a great option of using either vinyl tires or plastic ones – as someone who does not like vinyl, I really, applaud the inclusion of hard plastic. There is also a metal barrel included for both the main gun and the coaxial machine gun, which is also very much welcome. The suspension has metal springs -they do not work, but they do look realistic. Everything is safely bagged, in color-coded bags for the springs to make the job of the builder simpler – the whole package is just geared for a pleasant building experience. (You can find photos of the sprues in this review: https://www.themodellingnews.com/2019/07/in-boxed-135th-panhard-aml-90-light.html?m=1)

The painting was done with silly putty: I left the Vallejo dark grey primer as black, and applied NATO green and brown in successive steps.

Tiger Model 1/35 AML-90 Part 1.

A nice summary of the roles of the EBR, AML and the AMX-13 -since I have been building models of all three lately. If you want to buy an actual one for reference, then you can do that, too. There was also someone who scratch-built the interior– something definitely to be admired, but not for me.

The model comes in a box that resembles the 1:48 Tamiya kits -and this is a huge compliment. The packaging is great- parts are well protected, and even color coded with different bags to make identification easy. The detail is really good, without the excess part numbers some kits tend to come with.

The building phase -so far- was a joy; my only headache is the usual problem: how to display the gorgeous interior? Are the doors big enough to give an unobstructed view of the car, or should I start cutting parts away?

The age-old question; we will see what happens once I have some time to think about it properly. Any suggestions in the comment section are welcome!

Hobby Boss 1/35 EBR-10 Part 3. -Muddying things up

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The mud was created using Tamiya’s concerete textured paint as a base with lots of earth colored pigments and some static grass and sand added. The first batch was prepared using washable dust by Ammo, though – this represents the dried mud under all the subsequent layers. The next batch was created by adding different (and subsequently darkening) earth colored pigments; after application, as usual, I used a wet brush to adjust the effect, to remove some mud from some places, to move clumps around, and to subtly mix the different layers together. Once the lower hull and the wheels were dirtied up, I glued the wheels on.

The products for the mud I used were the following: Tamiya basing paste (concrete), Vallejo splashed mud, different earth colored pigments and sand with static grass.

(I know it is a lot… I accumulated them over the years, and never really gave them a proper tryout. It is the perfect opportunity I guess.)

If there is one fault of the kit is the tiny connection point between the axes and the wheels. It was really annoying to constantly re-gluing the whells, because the pin holding them was tiny and did not create a strong enough hold.

The last step was adding a couple of mud splashes using the above mixtures diluted with water, and a stiff old brush.

The top of the hull and the turret got some dust (washable dust by Ammo Mig, rainmarks by Vallejo), and pretty much it was it. While I do appreciate the Vallejo weathering products, as they are not solvent-based, they are more difficult to apply properly. The high surface tension of the water in them means they do not spread so easily, and they form tide marks very readily when applied to a dry surface directly. The best way I found to use them was to wet the surface, dilute the products somewhat, and keep feathering the edges of the patches so that the very marked tide-marks do not form. The key is to build up the effect in light layers. Using directly from the bottle will not yield good results.

The middle wheels were painted using AK’s True Metal paint to resemble the worn metallic surface. The same paint was used with dry brushing over some of the surfaces. The model got an overall flat coat (especially the canvas cover on the turret), and the edges were lined with silver pencil.

I did add a lot of petrol spill around the caps, but since the model was over-done, anyway, I really wanted to go the whole nine yards. Always wanted to do one of those over-weathered models… While they are certainly not realistic, they do look good. Mine looks like that the only reason why it does not fall apart due to the extensive rusting, or bursts into flames due to the gallons of spilled gasoline is the incredible amount of mud that holds the whole thing together…

I am not entirely satisfied with the results, but overall I quite like how it turned out.

By the way, the freaking wheels keep breaking off due to the tiny connecting pins snapping every time I handle the model. I gave up and used green stuff to fix them in place.

Hobby Boss 1/35 EBR-10 Part 2. Rust -and a proper tryout of Liquid Pigments by Lifecolor

A nice summary of the roles of the EBR, AML and the AMX-13 -since I have been building models of all three lately.

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Back to the model – building is done, proceeding to painting.

First stages…

I primed the model with Vallejo’s dark grey primer, and sprayed some rust brown over it – it will form the basis of chipping. I am going for the “World of Tanks look” – unrealistically worn armor that looks great and realistic in-game. (Figure that.)

I used the hairspray method for the larger chips – with AK’s Heavy Chipping fluid. I sprayed the fluid over the model, waited until it dried, and went over with PolyScale’s green (the label is too faded, I have no idea what green it is). I deliberately went for a light green, as it would become darker with further weathering. (I am experimenting here, so we are all very anxious of the results.)

After the paint dried I spent an exciting half an hour with some water and a stiff brush to remove some of the paint.

This is the result. It’s a bit rough on the edges, but the look is refined further in subsequent steps. (And do something about the canvas cover on the turret, I promise.)

Next up: Lifecolor’s liquid pigments -rust.

I have played around with this product, but this time I decided to give it a proper tryout. They were very useful to add rusty patches and discolorations to the model; although a lot of the effects were hidden by the subsequently added mud and dust…

As with most products it is difficult to judge the final look while it is wet; the good thing is that you can always adjust it later. If you add the different colors while the previous layers are still wet, they will mix readily; if you want to have a contrast, wait until everything dry before commencing with the next layer.

The best method was the usual one: apply, wait a bit, adjust/remove. The previous layers were very easy to remove if I was not careful; use a brush that is only a little bit wet, and do not wait until the layer you wish to adjust dries completely. (Or you can just seal everything with varnish if you choose to.)

On the top edge of the turret I tried to do some rust streaks – I have to say the liquid pigments worked just great. Once it was dry-ish, I could use a wet brush to feather the streaking a bit, just like with an enamel-based product. All-in-all I quite like these liquid pigments.

Next step -mud

 

Hobby Boss 1/35 EBR-10 part 1

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To help with the tedium of skype conferences, I did some work on a model waiting in the pile… the EBR-10. I became interested in it thanks to World of Tanks (a very common occurence), and since it is a fun little vehicle (which may be killing the game…) I decided to build one.

Since it is simple, I easily did it while listening in to these online conferences I am forced to attend.

Nothing special, really, most things just fell togheter. I am a bit irked by the rubber tires, and also the fact that the canvas cover of the oscillating turret is shorter than it should be, so there is a gap in the front (not on the photos, it was installed after), regardless, a fun little project – the building stage took me about 3 hours total…

 

1/35 Takom Turtle

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This weird looking vehicle got into my collection because I took my wife to the local hobby shop, and this was the only vehicle she liked. It has a relatively low part count, but it’s surprisingly large: it’s bigger than a panzer IV… (I expected it to be only slightly bigger than a car. Nevertheless I’d love to do my commute in this thing; London drivers are horrendous.)

This is my second Takom model (the first being the Ratte). The detail is OK, but not very subtle (I found the panel lines a bit too deep), and the model lacks any interior details. The hatches cannot be opened, either, so scratch-building (or using aftermarket sets if there ever will be one later) is going to be even more difficult. The quality of plastic, the presentation, the instructions are very, very professional. There are rubber tires provided, but they are quite unnecessary; plastic would be perfectly fine (with the appropriate sag moulded on, of course.) The fit is, again, OK but not perfect; the joint between the bottom and top of the hull needs some filling. (The bump on the top is assembled using four quadrant, and it’s a bit of a shaky exercise.) The model is very easy to build: it took about 2 hours to have it ready to paint.

I wanted to go all-out with the painting and weathering. First, I always wanted to try the complex camo with the black dividing line; and I wanted to do some experimenting with scratches, chips and dust. (Since it’s a city-car, only a little mud is used.) If you want to, you can go with the whole “captured vehicle in German service” cliche, but that version looks rather bland and grey.

 

The model was primed, and then the acrylic primer sealed with Testors Dulcote (as I wanted to experiment with some windex-chipping) later. The multiple colors were sprayed on in light patches. Although it’s an unconventional way to paint I painted individual patches, applied silly putty, added another set of patches with a different color, another application of silly putty, and so on and so forth. I did not want to paint the entire model with all the colors- it would have added too many paint layers. When doing scratches with windex I did not want to work through six individual layers of paint to the primer.

The results are actually pretty good; I was pleasantly surprised when I removed the silly putty.

 

The dividing lines were painted on using a black sharpie.

A few layers of light brown and ochre filters were added, and after a couple of days of drying I covered the model with Future in preparation for the washes. This is when I applied the decals, and sealed them with a further layer of Future.

I used Mig’s dark wash- applying it with a thin brush. It looked bad (as it always does), but I managed to wait an hour or so before attacking the wash. The excess was wiped away with a wet, flat brush in several steps (I kept adjusting it days after the application of the wash). I moved the brush in downwards motions; the wash created faint streaks which I kept adjusting. It also served as a sort of filter as well.

This is the point where I realized that the layers of Future will interfere with the windex-chipping technique… so I added paint chips using a brush and a sponge.

The next step was to use some oil dot filters. I put a few blobs of different shades of brown, yellow, blue and green oil paints onto a small piece of cardboard. In about an hour or so the linseed oil seeped out into the paper; this is important if you want flat finish. I added random dots on the surface, and then blended, removed them using a wet brush with downward motion. This produced very faint streaks, and modulated the base color somewhat. Yellows, greens, etc will give a slightly different tint to the underlying color. I focused the darker browns towards the bottom of the chassis. Since I was there I used a light rust color to form streaks: I prepared a dilute wash using a rust colored oil paint, and applied it with a faint brush. The excess was removed with a flat brush as usual forming faint streaks. I added this mixture around larger chips as well, and let it dry. If the effect was too strong, I adjusted it with a wet brush.

 

I left the model dry for a week, and used a similar technique to further add mud and dust onto the vehicle: I added small dust/mud colored paint on certain areas, and blended them in using a dry brush. It’s important that you have to use very small amount of paint.

I layered everything: on top of the thin, translucent dust/mud I added thicker pigments (mixture of flat varnish and pigment) of different colors; concentrating on the lower parts, of course. The very last couple of layers were splashes of different earth colors using a very stiff brush and a toothpick.

 

The next steps were more pronounced streaks using AK’s streaking products, and after that dried I sealed the whole model with a flat varnish. The inside of the headlights were painted using  liquid chrome by Molotov (great pens).

At this point my wife expressed her displeasure that the previously colorful, clean car became dirty and muddied up, so I decided to stop here.

 

 

 

Hunor Models 1/72 Csaba armored car – command version

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The 39.M Csaba was the standard armored scout car used by the Royal Hungarian Army during WWII. Some 39.M’s were used by the police force as well, but the main users of the vehicle were the reconnaissance units of the Army.

The Peace Treaties after WWI prohibited Hungary to possess any type of armored vehicles. This was the reason that the design and development of such vehicles only started in the ’30s. The story of the 39.M started with an automotive engineer, Miklos Straussler, and the Weisz Manfred Factory in Budapest. Straussler was an expat, who moved to England in the interwar period, and designed amphibious and off-road vehicles. Probably his most known designs were the flotation system for the DD tanks used by Allied forces during the war and the Alvis Straussler Bomb Trolley. He set up collaboration with the Weisz Manfred factory to produce armored cars and other designs for his home country.

The first armored car prototype –named AC1- was built in 1932 by Weisz using Straussler’s plans. This was followed by the AC2 in 1935. They enjoyed a modest export success, as the British Army ordered 53 AC2 chasses from Weisz Manfred. The engine, weapons, transmission and armor was supplied by the freshly formed joint Alvis-Straussler company in England. The “39.M Csaba felderito pancelkocsi” (reconnaissance armored car, named after the son of Attila the Hun) was developed from the AC2 in Hungary. It was a modern design and a very successful vehicle. The sloped body was riveted using 9mm armor plates. The powerplant was an 8 cylinder German-made Ford engine which gave it a maximum speed of 65 km/hrs. The transmission had 5 gears in both forward and reverse. All four wheels were driven, and the car had two driving positions as in most contemporary designs. It had an excellent off-road performance, but the complex driving arrangement made maintenance difficult, and due to the fuel capacity the range was somewhat limited (150km). It was armed with a 20mm 36M cannon and a 34/37A M 8mm MG in a rotating turret, giving it a respectable firepower. All vehicles were supplied with an R-4T radio, and had a crew of 3 (gunner, driver, radio operator/driver).

After the successful trials in 1939 the Army ordered 41 vehicles first, which was followed by subsequent orders. Altogether 135 39.Ms were built of which 30 was a special command version, the 40.M Csaba. This vehicle had extra R/4 and R/5 radios and a large pneumatic lattice radio mast installed, while the armament was removed.

The Csaba was used throughout the war; unfortunately no example survived.

 

 

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The model comes in the usual Hunor box: sturdy, flat cardboard (it found a new life as a toolbox). The box art is a very nice picture of the vehicle; it mistakenly says 39M (should say 40M, the command version). The parts are in ziplock bags, protected by packing peanuts. There are only 20 resin parts, a small and delicate photoetched fret, and the decal sheet produced by HAD. (My review sample did not contain the decals, so I used the Bison Decals offering of Hungarian tanks; it offers a number of options for most armored vehicles used by the Hungarian Army; in fact I was hard pressed to decide which one I want to use.)

The instructions are quite basic. Most of the time it is not a problem as the model is easy to assemble, but there are some areas where references will come invaluable. The pneumatic arms raising the radio mast, and the lifting hooks on the body need to be made by the modeler, and not much reference is given.

The parts are molded in cream colored resin; the pouring blocks are smartly placed, and easy to remove (with the exception of the turret where you have to saw through the whole base, which is not a design flaw, but a necessity of the molding process). The quality of the resin is very good: I did not find any casting imperfections. The model measures up to scale drawings nicely; the rivets and the armored panels are at the right place, and more importantly, right size. (In small scale models rivets tend to be exaggerated, giving the models a very characteristic Warhammer 40k look.) The included PE fret carries the radio mast and a few small parts for the model. It is very fine and delicate; care must be taken not to break the metal.

 

 

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The construction is quite straightforward and simple; it took me about two hours total. As I mentioned the only part I was worried about was the fabrication of the pneumatic arms, but it was surprisingly easy to make them from Evergreen plastics. I used slow drying superglue to fix the radio mast and the arms, which gave me time enough to position them correctly. The lifting hooks I made are a bit oversized and placed too close to the arms –they should be a bit further up.

The camouflage I chose was a pre and early-war three-color one with big, colorful markings from Bison. I used a paintbrush, as I still had no access to my airbrush when I built this vehicle. (Later in the war a much more subdued overall green or gray color was adopted; perhaps later I’ll build a 39.M in those colors.) Weathering was done using pigments mostly.

All in all, it’s a cool little model, and the antenna makes it look very unique.

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References:
The Magyar Steel, Modell & Makett kulonszam, online photos and the-blueprints.com website.