Krispi Kreme Lowrider

This is an old project -my first attempt on decal printing. (Apologies for the photo quality -it was done using one of the first smart phones – the HTC Mogul).

There’s not much to talk about: I used a Chevy Impala model to pimp it out, and since I’m a pastry white dude, I felt I don’t have enough credibility for an actual lowrider. (Even though I’d love to have a real one.) So I chose Krispy Kreme. Testors has a nice decal designing/printing set, which is really easy to use. (You print the design on a white/transparent paper, apply the varnish, and you’re done.)

The car was painted in iridescent pearl and green color, and then the decal applied.

As an accompanying music, listen to Cypress Hill.

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Two-in-one model: KV-220 and T-150

Having the KV-220 in World of Tanks, I got the model because I was interested in building the tank itself. (There’s a slight mixup in-game with the actual designations.) It turns out PSP, the makers of the model were planning ahead, and included a lot of extra parts for all the different versions of the KV family. You get a bunch of extra turrets, gun mantles and all sort of other parts; and I noticed I can actually build a second turret for the T-150 version. Since this is also a version I was planning to build, and I did not cherish the opportunity to building a second hull (it also meant I saved some money as well), I decided to make this tank into a 2-in-1 model: depending on which version I would like to display I can decide which turret to put on top of the hull. (If I manage, I’ll get a KV-3 turret as well, to make it into a 3-in-1 tank, since they all share the same hull.)

The construction went along nicely; the plastic is good quality, and the flash can be cut off carefully. One glaring issue with the kit is the tracks… there’s not enough of them. This version of the KV is actually longer than the original tank, and the tracks included are enough only for the shorter version. I only noticed this when I finished one set already; both drive wheels and both idlers already had the individual links attached to them. This left me with only a couple of options: try to get a replacement set (could not get any), or make use of the ones I already have somehow -which I what I did. The tank is depicted with a set of broken tracks; the only real problem is that tracks don’t break like this. They usually break while the vehicle is in motion, so they’d be thrown either behind or in front of the tank by the drive wheel (depending on where the track has broken, and which direction the tank was going). I’m not sure it’s even possible to have track break like this – perhaps if the tank was immobile, and someone just pulled out a track pin from the top section.
I got an aftermarket barrel for the KV-220 version, and also a set of towing cables; they do improve the look of the model. I could not find a metal 107mm gun barrel, so I used the one supplied with the kit (which looks like a tree log, but there you go. Sacrifices had to be made; if you don’t like it, you can just look at the photos with the other turret on. 🙂 )

First black primer, then green from a Tamiya spray can.

Disaster strikes -the paint breaks up, cracks, and looks pretty horrible in general. (I wouldn’t mind to be able to actually do this effect.) This Tamiya spray has done it before once, and back then I blamed the cold weather. (I sprayed a tank outside in wintertime.) This time there is no such excuse. The can landed in the trash. This and the track issue made me abandon this project for a while. (In principle I don’t throw models away. It came close to ritual melting, though.)

Rescued… Carefully sanded off the offending paint. (Also: a perfect look at the imperfectly broken tracks.)

The final product. Unfortunately no photos were taken during the painting step, as I pretty much gave up on the model at that point.

In short: I’ve repainted the model using several layers of different shades of green. I essentially used a semi-dry brushing technique: I made sure that the paint was not removed from the bush as much as it usually is during drybrushing, and added layers upon layers of green. The result was surprisingly nice and smooth. (I think it’s a kind of a blending technique Wargamers use.)

As you can see the bottom hull is already weathered and muddied up; this is because it’s much easier to do these steps before the tracks are glued on; and the tracks can only be glued on before the top part of the hull is attached…

Once the base color was finished, I applied some patriotic slogans using dry transfers, and painted some parts (mostly hatches and panels that stand out) in a lighter shade of green. The contrast was pretty large, but this was taken care of in the next step. I added filters using the oil paint-dot method. Principally blue, white, yellow, green, burnt umber and burned sienna was used. The last two colors were also used to create pin-washes. (Since I did not want to cover the surface with gloss varnish, I simply wet the surface with spirit, and used the surface tension to add the paint to the crevices.

Brown/black was used to paint scratches onto areas where wear and tear usually happens.

After this, the whole model was sealed with semi-matte varnish.

Once it was done, I tried some of the true earth weathering products, but the fading agent and other filters just did not spread out well. I suspect the surface must be absolutely matte, or I should use some surfactant to help it spread better. It does look good, though, just make sure you don’t overuse the filters.

Some dust and dirt were added to the upper hull, and the model was done for good. It turned out much better than I expected; this should be a lesson to all. (Not sure what the lesson is, but it should definitely be one.)

There you go: a 2-in-1 model of two Russian experimental heavy tanks.

Calas Typhon – Forgeworld

This is one character who started out as a gigantic tosser, and ended up being an ever bigger one. With the Heresy what is most interesting is to see what drives people to turn against the Imperium. Sometimes these choices are agonizing for the characters who make them; and you cannot really help but feel sympathy towards them, even after they become a twisted caricature of their former self. (Think about Lorgar himself; or Khran, who already was featured here.)

Thypon (or later known as Thypus) has, however, never been a nice person. Always arrogant, always sneering, always self-righteous; it’s hard to find anything likeable about the guy. (He does sport some amazing beard, though.) Let’s face it, he is somewhat of a one-dimensional anti-hero.
Nevertheless, the Forgeworld figure is just incredibly good-looking. The heavy stride of someone in heavy a Terminator armour captured incredibly well. You can hear the footsteps, you can feel the tremor of the earth, and you can clearly see that this armour was not designed to be jogging in it. It also looks pretty realistic; my biggest issue with older iterations of Terminator armours is that they look unwieldy; just look at an old Games Workshop Abaddon figure to see what I mean. He literally is forced to keep his arms up in a threatening pose, because he cannot physically bring them lower towards his torso. (Which is good if you want to threaten someone, but bad, if you want to actually do anything else. Like moving.) The new Forgeworld Terminator figures -while it’s clear that the wearer will not do splits in them any time soon- look more realistic as power armours go.
The kit is also a good starting point for the character himself. This is the original state from which he got corrupted into a plague Marine, harbinger of disease and corruption.

This guy.

Citadel Finecast did come out with a Chaos corrupted Typhus before, and you can see the similarities between the figures.

The sculptor at Forgeworld used this figure as a basis, and he made an excellent work.
Since the Death Guard is under the influence of the Lord of Decay, Nurgle, they are quite foul creatures. I tried to depict the beginnings of receiving the favours of this Chaos god might look like: the originally granite-grey armour got a yellowish sheen, representing a thin layer of filth, quite possibly excreted by the amour itself. He has made his first step in the path of corruption. I’ve also used transparent paints I use normally to simulate fuel stains on tanks. One brilliant thing I realized was that the usual problem with washes (namely the wash dries in a way that the pigments in the wash flow towards the edges of the wet area away from the cracks, which look bad if you use the wash to accent shadows) actually look pretty on-spot with Typhon -after all, his armour does excrete some foul substances, which will dry in patches on the surface.
Scratches in white, and white highlights helped to bring out the details; I’ve also used very thin dark washes to further enhance the whole oily-filthy impression. Most of the metallic parts were painted in dark, oxidated tin color, although not yet in the greenish hues of old, oxidated bronze. The edge of the Power Scythe was highlighted with light blue/white to represent the force-field; perhaps I should redo it in green to stick to the whole corruption/disease theme. (Blue is always a color of purity; glowing green, however, is usually reserved for containers of super-diseases and biological weapons in popular lore.)

To be honest, the base caused the most problems; I just could not get the colors right. I tried different greys to depict the broken concrete, but it just did not look “real”. The breakthrough came when I realized that the “right” look can only be achieved using layers and layers of different grays and browns. I’ve kept drybrushing with different colors (metallic colors included at places), using different highlights, adding filters, washes and pigments; after about a month of working on it on and off, I decided it looked good enough to stop.

Well, here he is, striding into corruption, massacring loyalist forces with his arm-mounted flame-thrower/chemical weapon. (I think flames would be too “pure” for a Nurgle-champion; it must be some chemical contortion that melts metal as well as flesh. Whatever it is, it looks pretty cool, although I do suspect the short barrel causes some accidental drips onto his own armour now and then.)

Forgeworld: Khran the Betrayer

Since the Horus Heresy book series started Forgeworld also started issuing miniatures of the most prominent characters. I don’t like all of them, but most are actually pretty awesome (and expensive). Like this guy: Khran.

His character in itself -along his friend, Argel Tal- is one of my favourites. Khran knowingly slides into corruption because of his loyalties. He is a noble warrior (as far as any Astrates can be noble; let’s face it, all of those guys are kind of dicks), who somehow retains fragments of his nobility even when he turns traitor. You can understand why he betrays the Imperium, and to be honest, he kind of has a point, too.
He is aware of the corruption as it happens to him, and this makes him cynical and disillusioned, as he knows he has no choice in the matter. All of his choices were taken away from him by the Emperor of Mankind (who is either incompetent or just plain stupid), and his damaged Primarch (who should have been put down as soon as he was discovered for the good of everyone, himself included).

Anyhow, since I liked the character I bought the figure. The pose is pretty dynamic (unfortunately Angron’s –another available figure from this series- pose is the mirror image of his), the quality is excellent, and you get a couple of options, too. (Helmet on/helmet off, and different weapons.) I’ve left out the second figure that came in this set. He had his helm caved in, his arm cut off, blood squirting; I felt this was an unnecessary addition. The leaping, axe-wielding Astrates would be perfectly enough to convey the berserker savagery of the World Eater; blood splatters and dead bodies flying around was not needed. (This is why I opted for the helmeted head –it’s scarier to see the contrast of an impassive mask, and the brutal, mad frenzy of Khran.)

This is the first time I painted anything in white, which was not very easy, truth be told. The figure was first painted with grey primer, and then several light layers of white Citadel paint was added. I used very thin filters of dirt and grey colors to make the armor look used and dirty. Whenever the effects were overdone (several instances) I went back to correct them with white. This actually created a nice, layered look. I also tried to avoid “clean” colors –everything should look dirty, oily and damaged, as our friend probably does not spend as much time with patient armor maintenance as he should be. It’s probably not the “official” GW paint style, but to be honest I was quite satisfied with the results. (Except for the plasma gun. That gun will need some more work looking at the photos…)

30th Post: a Teaser – Flyhawk Panzer II.J., Panzer I. F., Armory MS-1 (T-18) and the Tankom 1/144 Landkreuzer Ratte

This is the 30th post of this blog, and since I’d like to have regular readers, feedback, comments, and all that jazz, it is also an unashamed attempt for getting people to visit… There are several new and old builds waiting to be published in the draft section, but here are four amazing models I am reviewing for Armorama this month… and these three will also be featured in this blog. So… subscribe and keep coming back here already!

(If this does not work, I’ll be posting the third page from The Sun from now on.)

Hobby Boss 1/35 Pz.Kpfw. I. Ausf. F (VK 18.01) Early (filters on a gray base color)

This was an impulse buy from Ebay. I always liked this tank: it looks like a clumsy little cousin of the “big boys”… A small tank that desperately wants to be taken seriously, so it has as much armor as a Tiger, but somehow forgotten to upgrade the armament. I guess this makes it look more like a joke, than an actual threat: you can run away from it, and the pea-shooters it has for guns are not looking very menacing, either. I always think of “Hans the Tank Engine” when I see this guy. Everything seems oversized: the roadwheels, the tracks, the armor except for the tiny-winy little guns and the turret.

There are a couple of reasons I regretted buying this model. One is the scale; 1/35 became a bit too large for me lately. (I’ve gotten used to faster builds in Braille scale.) For this reason I would rather have preferred to get the Armory model in 1/72 scale (or the new Flyhawk one). The other is that I realized Bronco issued the same kit (what is it with these companies suddenly coming out with obscure tanks at the same time, anyway?), with full interior, no less… This actually made me weep.

Anyhow.

This tank has a designation of Pz.KPfw. I. but it has almost nothing in common with the Ausf A, B or C versions. It has an incredibly thick armor for its size (80mm max), and it’s armed with two MG-34s. It did reach 25kmph on roads, though. Thirty of these little guys were made during the early years of the war.

Incredibly, a couple of these tanks did see combat at Kursk… the rest were used as training tanks.

The building was simple, straightforward and easy. The kit is a very well-engineered one, and not difficult to build at all. The prominent hatch on the side is modelled closed- even though it IS open in the box art. The other annoying thing is the lack of clear parts for the headlights. They give you a plastic lens. A pair of grey plastic lens. (As soon as I find my two-part clear epoxy, I’ll fill the headlights in.)

I decided to go with the panzer grey theme; it does look a bit boring at first look, but it gave me an opportunity to experiment with filters and pre-shading. The aim was to depict a tank after a couple of days of training: dusty, somewhat battered learner’s tank.

As a first step after applying the black primer and the grey paint was to add lighter version of the base paint to the outstanding areas: periscope covers, hatch, edges, headlights, etc.

It does look unrealistic, but it still looks pleasing to the eye. The question was: how much of this will blend in after the filters? After all you’d only want a slight hint of the contrast remain; something your eye sees but your brain does not.

Next step: washes. With burned umber and black oil paints. (I left the paints on some cardboard to drain it from the excess linseed oil.) After adding the pinwashes, and waiting about 1 hours, I removed the excess with a damp brush.

Sorry for the poor quality photos… my new phone does have a bad camera, and I was lazy to set up the lightbox and the actual digital camera I use.

Next came the filter. After sealing the paint with a semi-matt clear coat, I thought of what sort of hues I want to achieve on the base color. I ended up using blue, black, white, yellow, raw umber and burned umber in different quantities on different panels. After the oil dried I applied some scratches using black-brown to the edges and other areas where I expect the paint to be damaged. (It should have been done earlier, but I really wanted to carry on with the filters.) I also tried making actual scratches lightly over the black primer; if you are careful, the black shows through, forming a pretty convincing scratch.)

The result can be -kind of- seen in the photos I’ve taken with the crappy smartphone camera… some hint of color on the grey surface does show.

In the meanwhile the tools were painted as well. The wooden handles were painted in a light tan color, and then I used brown oil paint to simulate the grain of the wood. Add the undiluted paint to the ends, and use a brush to pull it down towards the middle – easy and very convincing.

After this step I attached the tools to the model; I usually weather them at the same time as the models, which blends their color together a bit. (With the dot method I leave the tools off as the brush tends to remove them during the more vigorous movements…)

I also applied several pre-mixed filters (fading and aging effects) by True Earth using an airbrush. They are water soluble, and contain no pigments. I found that they don’t spread evenly; when sprayed or brushed onto the surface, they tend to break up into tiny droplets. I’ll experiment with some surfactants to see if this can be remedied. Using Citadell’s Lahmian medium might also be a solution to the problem – we’ll see.

The next step was the pigments. For this I only used water diluted pigments: I made an industrial slurry-looking thin mixture, and using a brush I applied it to the crevices and panel lines. Once dry I used my finger to wipe/smear the extra off. They were applied in heavier layers on the bottom/sides of the hull. I used several layers of all sorts of earth/dust-colored pigments to have variation.

The filters and the pigments look pretty convincing in my opinion. Some fibers from the cotton swabs can be spotted, unfortunately; they were an early (and aborted) attempt in removing the oil washes. As a finishing touch I used a lead pencil on the edges of the tank, and on the tracks to simulate the metallic sheen of actual metal. This does make the tank look more real.

Now that it’s done, it will go into it’s little display case which it will share with a Hobby Boss Toldi I, as soon as the Toldi is finished.

A simple Warhammer 40K dio brought to you by Ferrero Rocher -part 2

This is my second foray into the world of Chaos Space Marines. This little diorama was created to provide a safe base for the Dark Vengeance Astrates I have got from Ebay, using a Rocher Ferrero box as a display case. I did not really have a concept in mind aside from depicting the characters as advancing on an unseen foe. (This was due to the small size of the box; had there been more space available, I could have put in a dreadnought or an Ultramarine Terminator as an enemy to advance upon. (I did buy a couple of models off Ebay over the last couple of years, but only now have I started to actually finish them properly. A lot of the models I got needed extensive surgery or their paintjob stripped, as I got them cheap and used, which hindered the work. Mostly due to my laziness, but still. Buy new if you can help it.) The other big push to actually start taking painting WH40K seriously was the fact that my landlord was giving up the hobby, and he sold me his paintset for ten quid. And we’re not talking about the starter set… we’re talking about a HUGE box of paints, washes and inks. I started to watch videos about blending, how to paint fabric, and all the other tricks of the trade – so I found these little figures a welcome variety from the dull-colored tanks (and they look awesome in general).
Anyhow, here is the second box of Chaos.

The figures themselves are brilliant: their poses are very dynamic, and the details are just amazing. The only issue I had with them was the seam lines which were sometimes on very visible- and hard to reach places. Most of them were filled in, but I’ve left one or two untouched because I was worried about the potential damage to the surrounding detail. Since then I got a bottle of no-sand putty from True Earth; this should help next time.

I tried to give these guys some justice (since they got none from the Emperor…), but this is how far I got. The Emperor’s Children warlock (I think… that third eye must be a sure sign of psychic powers) got completely dark eyes – ever since I’ve read about Daemonhosts in the Eisenhorn trilogy I liked this idea of the absolutely black eyes without the whites around the iris. I guess it’s not far-fetched to imagine a sorcerer who is possessed by a daemon, so this works out fine. The only thing I forgot to do before taking photos was to apply some matt varnish to the cape; it is too shiny to be a convincing fabric.

The most loving care was given to the Death Guard with his axe. His armor is probably not going to be shiny and clean; but I did not want to go for the full-on “puss filled boils and rust” look, either. I made him unclean looking using some oil washes, and the “fuel stain” product from AK, and used different browns, reds and organges to make his axe rusty-looking.

The Dark Angel was the less inspired of the three, as I don’t know much about these guys yet. The whole paintwork started by priming him black, and then trying my hands on the Citadel line of inks – it worked well to produce a deep dark-green color. The orange gem on this chest does need some work yet, I admit.

I used some pigments on the boots and fabric to depict dirt -after all, they are on a muddy battlefield-, and called it a day. The diorama base was prepared the same way as the previous one -using cork as pieces of rock/concrete buildings (at this stage it’s uncertain), and weapons and armor pieces from the spares box to add some variety. I ended up using actual earth mixed with white glue as a base with different shades of pigments sprinkled on top.

A simple Warhammer 40K dio brought to you by Ferrero Rocher -part 1

The Warhammer universe is a very fascinating one indeed. From a (somewhat over the top) space-opera-based table-top game it became a very interesting universe with an incredibly fascinating lore. This is a world, where the Imperium of Man is even worse than the Nazi regime, yet they are the good guys, simply because the others are even worse than them… (Worth reading just to get a sense what the dark AD 40 000 means for Humanity.)

True, most of the books read like fan fiction, but there are true gems in the Black Library. Aaron Dembski-Bowden and Abnet two of the best writers ever worked with Games Workshop, and created some truly remarkable books about Chaos, and what corruption is for people (normal or space marine) who fall into corruption -from their own choice (Eisenhorn), or because someone else made this choice for them (Thousand Sons). Since reading The Legion and the First Heretic from the Horus Heresy series, the Night Lords series, and the Talon of Horus, I became immensely fascinated by Astrates who turned to Chaos. Most other writers simply depict them as quite undimensional characters -as in “hur-hur, we worship Chaos and froth in the mouth”. Dembinsky made a pretty good case that these traitors actually have a point, and they are more than just a bunch of brainless maniacs… So I got myself a couple of WH40K figures (both Forgeworld and GW ones) on Ebay and got on painting.

The question is though- how you display them? The answer, of course, is the eight-sided plastic boxes Ferrero Rocher comes in… (Eight, as we know, is a special number signifying Chaos Undivided.)

Well, for this project everything was new- so I made everything up as I went along…

Base: turn the box upside down; the top will serve as a base. Glue pieces of cork onto it, as it can be used as an excellent way to depict rubble, stones, broken concrete.

Added some Tamiya texture paint (concrete color and earth color). Did some oil washes on the cork slabs.

I glued some pieces of weapons and different debris from my spares box (also from Ebay) on to the base, but it did not look very convincing. From then on, I just said screw that, and used actual dirt mixed with white glue… Once it settled, I sprinkled all sort of earth and dust colored pigments on top, and called the earthwork done. Most everything (weapons, vehicle parts, etc) are covered completely, but hey, it’s a battlefield, right?

The painting of the figures took about six months of work on and off. I kept watching tutorials on youtube (especially about how to paint fabric), and kept doing and redoing the paintwork. Also experimented a lot using inks and washes. I have to say I did learn a lot about figure painting, but I’m still not doing the GW school of painting very well. (Jewels are still not working out well…)

I chose three of the seven Dark Vengeance chaos Astrates, and glued them onto the base. Job done.

I tried to choose figures that complement each other- a sorcerer, a World Eater berserker, and an Emperor’s Children space marine. The paintwork is trying to convey the differences between these characters: the sorcerer is well-kept, the World Eater is wearing a very, very worn, damaged and mutated power armor, and the Emperor’s Children has also seen better days when it comes to paintjob and general armor maintenance. I really like the menacing pose the World Eater stroke: the power claws held slightly apart convey an incredible level of threat. The half-helmet is nice, too; it exposes the pallid flesh on his skull. (At least I chose to see it this way. My minis, my rules.)

Three other chaos chaps got onto another similar base for part 2.

The only thing left now is to clean off the sides of the base- but that’ll have to wait some time. I think we’ve had our fun together with these guys, and it’s time to move on.

AT-ST in the snow

This one is an old build, too… built in Florida, on a sunny Winter week. (This gave the idea for the snow…)

The kit is from a TJ Maxx at the Sawgrass expressway. For some reason they had an AT-ST for 2 dollars -which I had to buy, of course. This is my first Star Wars model. The build took about an hour, approximately.

The base is neutral gray. I decided to do a funky camo, and chose a nice gray-blue – it looks perfect for a winter setting. Took a big roll of masking tape, and started to cut shapes. The results are surprisingly good. (The secret, I think, is to keep it random. It’s very easy to start repeating the same patterns.)

I did not go for heavy weathering; just some light filters, some light pin washes, and scratches. I did, however, apply a couple of high-caliber laser hits.

Once the walker was ready, I used the usual white-glue and sodium bicarbonate mix for snow, and glued the whole setup into a display case for protection.

SD.Kfz 251 Bonanza part 3 – the weirdos

This is the final installment of the posts dedicated to the 1/72 Sd.Kfz.251 versions, and I collected the weirder, stranger looking ones here.

Sd.Kfz.251/23 Mitteler SchĂĽtzenpanzerwagen mit 2cm KwK

This was a reconnaissance version; they transformed the crew compartment into an enclosed one, and stuck a Haengelafette 38 turret on top of it. This was the same turret as used on the Sd.Kfz.250/9, which this model was supposed to replace.  To be fair, the vehicle did not progress further than prototype phase, and we don’t actually have evidence about most of its features -the outline of the interior, or the enclosed roof, among other things. (This bothers me a bit, as it makes no sense at all. The side-armor might be able to withstand small-arms fire, but nothing more, and by closing over the crew compartment you essentially took away most of the escape routes of the crew. Even outside battle, it must have been pretty awkward for the driver and the radio operator to stop and get out to take a leak, too. The halftrack is also larger than the 250/9, which makes it even less suitable for reconnaissance. It does look nice, though.

As usual, Modelltrans offers a conversion, which fits the DML kits quite nicely. (It’s made for the Hasegawa kit, but as I said before: there is no reason to choose any other 251 models than the DML offering. The only frustrating thing about the DML model is the license plate: you have to put the numbers and letters individually on. Not sure why this was important, but it does make things a bit slow. I usually chose birthdays of family members by the way.)

The PE is very delicate. It is so delicate, in fact, that you’ll snap it, if you bend it more than once. Be very careful.

The parts are nicely cast; even the resin 2cm gun barrel is perfect. (Not sure why Modelltrans does not provide a metal one). If you want to know more about the conversion, here’s the review.

Everything is in place.

The roof fits like a dream; only a little surgery was needed.

The final product. I have to say the assembly of the PE screens was very, very difficult. After detaching them by handling the kit, I attached them after I glued the model in place.

The model was relocated later into a different display case.

Sd.Kfz 251D/R-35

Now, this one is a weird contraption. It’s really difficult what went on in the minds of its creators, but it probably involved a lot of alcohol, and perhaps quite a bit of hallucinogenic substrates as well. There is only one photo available which depicts this strange conversion, and there’s no information who or why it was created. It might have been a couple of mechanics pulling pranks using derelict equipment. Why didn’t they just took the gun, and put it on a mount escapes me. I doubt the heavy turret on top of this vehicle helped with balance issues, and it was most likely not possible to turn it, either.

Again, ModellTrans comes to the rescue with a conversion. (Review here.)

The original

The conversion is simple; if it is the first time you try your hands on one of these sets, this should be the one you choose. (It was my first choice, in fact.)

I weathered the vehicle a lot, making sure the original camo is really, really worn, faded and battered. The back story is that the French mechanics, who made this conversion (the photo shows French soldiers, no Germans), used a really worn-out 251 as a base, and put a relatively undamaged turret from a captured-then-recaptured Hotskiss tank. The base is a somewhat corroded armor plate. The faded, damaged camo was done with drybrushing – several layers of the base and the camo colors on top of each other made the paint look like it was worn off. The corroded plate was painted red-brown (tamiya), and I used oil paints (umber, burned umber, red, black) to make the rust more realistic.

Sd.Kfz.251/16

These guys know how to make an entry

Flamethrowers are horrible weapons. (Not that other weapons are not horrible, but these are especially horrifying.)

Over the war different versions were used: a guy with a napalm tank on his back, converted tanks, and converted half-tracks as well. I’ve bought a white metal kit on Ebay because I wanted to see how good (or bad) they are, instead of getting the CMK conversion. Bad idea. Very bad idea. The model was horrible, heavy, and bent.

I took the flame-thrower part, and placed it into a DML model. Tried to add some details here and there (tubes, valves, etc.), but overall, I did not feel confident enough to completely rebuild the thing. I should have. Or I should have just thrown the whole thing out, and get the CMK conversion.

Well, here’s the result. Once painted, it does not look half bad; but it IS heavy. I managed to do the fading with several application of yellow and sand colored filters.

Sd. Kfz. 251/20

The last one is one of my favorite conversions: the UHU. The Germans were experimenting with night-fighting, and this one was one of the first ever night-vision equipment. (Well, one half. The other half was the detectors.) It was supposed to illuminate the battlefield with IR light, which was detected by the IR detectors attached to other vehicles. It did not work very well, of course, but it was a first step. (The first, practical night vision equipment was developed in the late 70s,.. so it did take some time.) Both Kora models and CMK produces conversion for this version, and I went with the CMK one -seeing that it was cheaper. The Kora is probably a bit more detailed, however, both conversion suffer from a very acute problem: they do not include the generator for the searchlight.

The CMK conversion is typical CMK: easy to build, clean, well made, but lacking some details. A full review is here.

I wanted to build the base vehicle as a reasonably clean, but used vehicle, and the searchlight received minimal weathering, as this system was not used extensively (and only for a short time). They were essentially fresh out of the factory when they were taken out of service, and the 251s converted back into troop carriers. (To this day I could not find out if the fire extinguishers were red in the inside of the vehicle. The ones mounted outside were usually painted in the camo colors; but I can’t find any information about the ones kept in the inside. I painted them red to give some contrast to the vehicle.)

Scale model building – amateur style