Category Archives: games workshop

Painting lights and lamps using Citadel Technical paints

This post is just a short summary of what I’ve learned using Cidtadel’s Technical paints. These paints are marketed for painting gemstones. (There’s also a traditional way if you’re interested.)

 

Anyhow; aside from painting gemstones (which I will do as I paint the odd WH40k figure here and there), I was interested in how these paints function for lamps and warning lights. I’ve used the SU-122‘s interior light and the Electric Mule‘s warning light to test them.

Interior lights

I’ve simply painted the base of the transparent light fixture with silver, and applied the Citadel paint on the top of the light. The paint flowed around the raised details depicting the protective wires, so I did not have to paint them separately, and also gave a nice, blue glass finish. It’s a perfectly good way to stain transparent light fixtures if the surface is not too large. Even with dedicated, transparent paints it’s a pain to achieve uniform coverage, so don’t expect perfectly even finish on large transparent parts. Since the depth of color of any glass object (such as a headlight lens) depends on the thickness, this uneven coverage actually produces quite a realistic effect.

 

Warning lights

In this instance I’ve used a yellow base color with the red technical paint applied. The effect, again, is pretty good, since the yellow + red gives a nice, uneven orange, which looks quite realistic as a translucent warning light.

 

In short: if you have these paints lying around, they are perfectly good for colored glass lenses, screens and warning lights. I’m sure Tamiya’s and other manufacturers’ transparent paints do the job similarly well, though.

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A simple Warhammer 40K dio brought to you by Ferrero Rocher -part 2

This is my second foray into the world of Chaos Space Marines. This little diorama was created to provide a safe base for the Dark Vengeance Astrates I have got from Ebay, using a Rocher Ferrero box as a display case. I did not really have a concept in mind aside from depicting the characters as advancing on an unseen foe. (This was due to the small size of the box; had there been more space available, I could have put in a dreadnought or an Ultramarine Terminator as an enemy to advance upon. (I did buy a couple of models off Ebay over the last couple of years, but only now have I started to actually finish them properly. A lot of the models I got needed extensive surgery or their paintjob stripped, as I got them cheap and used, which hindered the work. Mostly due to my laziness, but still. Buy new if you can help it.) The other big push to actually start taking painting WH40K seriously was the fact that my landlord was giving up the hobby, and he sold me his paintset for ten quid. And we’re not talking about the starter set… we’re talking about a HUGE box of paints, washes and inks. I started to watch videos about blending, how to paint fabric, and all the other tricks of the trade – so I found these little figures a welcome variety from the dull-colored tanks (and they look awesome in general).
Anyhow, here is the second box of Chaos.

The figures themselves are brilliant: their poses are very dynamic, and the details are just amazing. The only issue I had with them was the seam lines which were sometimes on very visible- and hard to reach places. Most of them were filled in, but I’ve left one or two untouched because I was worried about the potential damage to the surrounding detail. Since then I got a bottle of no-sand putty from True Earth; this should help next time.

I tried to give these guys some justice (since they got none from the Emperor…), but this is how far I got. The Emperor’s Children warlock (I think… that third eye must be a sure sign of psychic powers) got completely dark eyes – ever since I’ve read about Daemonhosts in the Eisenhorn trilogy I liked this idea of the absolutely black eyes without the whites around the iris. I guess it’s not far-fetched to imagine a sorcerer who is possessed by a daemon, so this works out fine. The only thing I forgot to do before taking photos was to apply some matt varnish to the cape; it is too shiny to be a convincing fabric.

The most loving care was given to the Death Guard with his axe. His armor is probably not going to be shiny and clean; but I did not want to go for the full-on “puss filled boils and rust” look, either. I made him unclean looking using some oil washes, and the “fuel stain” product from AK, and used different browns, reds and organges to make his axe rusty-looking.

The Dark Angel was the less inspired of the three, as I don’t know much about these guys yet. The whole paintwork started by priming him black, and then trying my hands on the Citadel line of inks – it worked well to produce a deep dark-green color. The orange gem on this chest does need some work yet, I admit.

I used some pigments on the boots and fabric to depict dirt -after all, they are on a muddy battlefield-, and called it a day. The diorama base was prepared the same way as the previous one -using cork as pieces of rock/concrete buildings (at this stage it’s uncertain), and weapons and armor pieces from the spares box to add some variety. I ended up using actual earth mixed with white glue as a base with different shades of pigments sprinkled on top.

A simple Warhammer 40K dio brought to you by Ferrero Rocher -part 1

The Warhammer universe is a very fascinating one indeed. From a (somewhat over the top) space-opera-based table-top game it became a very interesting universe with an incredibly fascinating lore. This is a world, where the Imperium of Man is even worse than the Nazi regime, yet they are the good guys, simply because the others are even worse than them… (Worth reading just to get a sense what the dark AD 40 000 means for Humanity.)

True, most of the books read like fan fiction, but there are true gems in the Black Library. Aaron Dembski-Bowden and Abnet two of the best writers ever worked with Games Workshop, and created some truly remarkable books about Chaos, and what corruption is for people (normal or space marine) who fall into corruption -from their own choice (Eisenhorn), or because someone else made this choice for them (Thousand Sons). Since reading The Legion and the First Heretic from the Horus Heresy series, the Night Lords series, and the Talon of Horus, I became immensely fascinated by Astrates who turned to Chaos. Most other writers simply depict them as quite undimensional characters -as in “hur-hur, we worship Chaos and froth in the mouth”. Dembinsky made a pretty good case that these traitors actually have a point, and they are more than just a bunch of brainless maniacs… So I got myself a couple of WH40K figures (both Forgeworld and GW ones) on Ebay and got on painting.

The question is though- how you display them? The answer, of course, is the eight-sided plastic boxes Ferrero Rocher comes in… (Eight, as we know, is a special number signifying Chaos Undivided.)

Well, for this project everything was new- so I made everything up as I went along…

Base: turn the box upside down; the top will serve as a base. Glue pieces of cork onto it, as it can be used as an excellent way to depict rubble, stones, broken concrete.

Added some Tamiya texture paint (concrete color and earth color). Did some oil washes on the cork slabs.

I glued some pieces of weapons and different debris from my spares box (also from Ebay) on to the base, but it did not look very convincing. From then on, I just said screw that, and used actual dirt mixed with white glue… Once it settled, I sprinkled all sort of earth and dust colored pigments on top, and called the earthwork done. Most everything (weapons, vehicle parts, etc) are covered completely, but hey, it’s a battlefield, right?

The painting of the figures took about six months of work on and off. I kept watching tutorials on youtube (especially about how to paint fabric), and kept doing and redoing the paintwork. Also experimented a lot using inks and washes. I have to say I did learn a lot about figure painting, but I’m still not doing the GW school of painting very well. (Jewels are still not working out well…)

I chose three of the seven Dark Vengeance chaos Astrates, and glued them onto the base. Job done.

I tried to choose figures that complement each other- a sorcerer, a World Eater berserker, and an Emperor’s Children space marine. The paintwork is trying to convey the differences between these characters: the sorcerer is well-kept, the World Eater is wearing a very, very worn, damaged and mutated power armor, and the Emperor’s Children has also seen better days when it comes to paintjob and general armor maintenance. I really like the menacing pose the World Eater stroke: the power claws held slightly apart convey an incredible level of threat. The half-helmet is nice, too; it exposes the pallid flesh on his skull. (At least I chose to see it this way. My minis, my rules.)

Three other chaos chaps got onto another similar base for part 2.

The only thing left now is to clean off the sides of the base- but that’ll have to wait some time. I think we’ve had our fun together with these guys, and it’s time to move on.