Category Archives: ace model

ACE Models: 1/72 Shot Meteor

Another ACE kit… A Centurion in IDF service. I will write a review of it for Armorama; for now, a few points:

There is a substantial amount of flash, and also seam lines everywhere. The detail, in general, is good, but the gun barrels are not exactly great. Lots of sink marks and whatnot -not ideal. The other big issue I have is the rubber track… each section is made up by two parts, and you are supposed to melt them together. Not going to happen. (I do wish ACE switched to link-and-length…)

 

 

 

Otherwise it is a good kit. Not as refined, perhaps, than a Flyhawk model, but you don’t need to be spoiled all the time; it builds up into a respectable replica of a Centurion, and that’s that. It is absolutely recommended.

 

 

Painting will commence as soon as I have some time to bring out the airbrush… Right now my modelling time increased because I can actually work while listening to pointless skype meetings, but airbrushing would be one step too far I feel. Stay safe, everyone!

ACE Model 1/72 AMX-13/75 part 2.

 

Part 1. 

Well, the painting stage was long, protracted and not very well documented; I apologize for that.

 

Regardless: as usual, the model was primed with Vallejo’s acrylic primer, and then I chose a green color that was the closest to the Bolivian scheme I chose from the instructions. (The temptation was high to use a fictional, World of Tanks camo, but this model was for review, so I stuck with a historical one.)

The top of the model got the same green with some yellow added to lighten it up, and form a sort of zenithal lightning.

The canvas was painted with bestial brown by Citadell, and highlighted with buff and bestial brown. The handles were painted in a light green color (the filters lessened the contrast later on). Using sponge and a 00 brush I added some faint paint chips using Vallejo’s German black brown mixed with green on areas where I thought the heavy wear would damage the paint (the thin metal of the tool boxes, around hatches, on the edges, etc.).

After that it was dark brown washes, some highlights added with a fine brush, and then I used a couple of green and brown filters made from oil paints and ZestIt. The dust on the top surfaces and mud on the lower chassis (I did not want to have an overly muddy vehicle) was done using Vallejo’s dust washes and pigments. Again: once applied, you wait a bit, and remove, blend and adjust for a realistic look. Once done I sealed the paint with a flat varnish, and used a silver pencil on the edges to give the model a metallic look.

 

All-in-all, this was a really nice little model with good detail; no complaints at all.

ACE Model 1/72 AMX-13/75 part 1.

ACE has recently issued a 1/72 scale AMX-13/75, which was a welcome news since the only Braille scale models of this tank I know of are a few, quite expensive resin kits which are also quite difficult to get, and an old Heller kit, which is inaccurate and also not easily available. 

 

The AMX-13 light tank had a long service history, produced for over thirty years between the 50s and 80s, undergoing multiple rounds of modifications and modernization. The most apparent of which was the increase of gun caliber from 75mm to 105mm. The full designation of the tank is  Char 13t-75 Modèle 51, referencing the weight (13 tons), and the caliber of the main gun (75mm).

 

This is my second ACE kit; so I was curious how it would turn out.

 

The plastic is soft, but not too soft; it is easy to work with. There is some flash on some of the parts – take care removing it as the soft plastic is very easy to cut. And while the plastic might be a bit soft, the details are most definitely not; I have to say I was impressed with the surface detail. (Except for the 50 cal machine gun; it looks a bit bare.) There are seam lines on every part you will have to deal with, though. 

The model gets PE as well, which is a very welcome addition, as it adds some very convincing detail to the tank: engine grilles, and headlight protectors and a few other details.

The tracks are the rubber band type, but plastic glue works on them. This is something I welcome wholeheartedly; none of that nonsense with tracks that cannot be glued. 

Personally I do prefer plastic link-and-length tracks (or PE…) but these work fine, the detail is somewhat weak, but still OK. 

 

The assembly is relatively quick and straightforward. The fit is great, so there is no complaint there; I elected to fill in a few seams on the connecting surfaces of some panels, but I am not sure they would show up if I had left them as they were. The model is a pretty “old-school” design, so no slide-molds and elaborately shaped plastic parts are present; every complex shape is put together from flat panels. ACE did a very good job designing the model, as at the end you will have a very nice representation of the AMX-13/75.

The oscillating turret is very nicely reproduced -with one serious issue of the kit: the very prominent canvas cover protecting the joint between the two parts of the turret. This had been occasionally removed from the real vehicles, and you can certainly omit it from your  build. If you go this way, be aware that there is detail under the canvas: the seam and the attachment points where the canvas is fixed to are quite visible. (These details are not present in this kit.) As the shape is quite complex, the model’s canvas cover is supposed to be assembled from four parts. The assembly did not exactly go by the book. First, the canvas detail is too big; it should not be this thick and bulging (it also looks very “orderly”; not at all how canvas is folding). It is a thin sheet of canvas, after all. Second, the parts do not connect… (see photos.) They are too short to go around the turret, leaving prominent gaps, which have to be filled. I glued them on as best as I could, and then used putty and green stuff to fill in the missing parts. It does the job, but the detail is still over-emphasised. I think there are two options, really. You either leave it off (as virtually all builds I have seen online did it), and accept that the detail is not perfect, or just make your own using some putty. Since this is a review of the kit, I installed the kit part as best as I could.

 

Here is a very nice photo of the canvas cover on the turret -from a different vehicle, but the turret is identical.

A side note: that driver with his helmet and googles looks like a skull… every time I see this photo it draws my eyes to him.

 

 

ACE Model 1/72 FV4005 Stage 2 – part 2.

Part 1

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Well, the painting of the beast has arrived.

I’ve chosen a tricky pattern which I already attempted with my Cromwell (not to much success). This is one of my favourite World of Tanks camo schemes from the British branch.

It took a while to figure out the best way to replicate the pattern. After priming (Vallejo German Grey) I painted everything in the pale greenish color which will be forming the large patches (a mixture of Tamiya JA Grey and dark green). Once it dried I added patches of silly putty, and painted everything in Tamiya JA grey – this will form the thin line between the green and the black.

 

After it dried, I carefully squeezed the sides of the putty patches to spread them out a bit- this covered the thin areas of the grey color. Then I sprayed the model with the priming color lightened with Tamiya JA Grey. (Using the same color to lighten all the camo colors tie them together well.)

I have to say the results turned out to be better than I expected; although I did have to touch up on some of the patches.

As usual, a couple of layers of green and ochre filters helped to blend the colors together, and I sprayed Future on the model to provide base for the decals. (There were only three decals provided; apparently there should have been a “Spud” marking, too, according to the instructions, but it was missing.)

 

Once the decals dried, I sealed them with Future, and applied a dark pin wash to the model. After about a day of drying I used a wet brush to remove the excess, forming some good-looking streaks in the process. Wherever I felt there was too much wash left on the surface of the model I used a flat dry brush to remove it. I repeated the same process with dot-filters; the browns, yellows and blues formed nice, faint streaks on the sides of the vehicle.

Using a 00 brush I painted discreet chips on the tank. The color German Black Brown by Vallejo is great for deeper chips where the metal is showing through. I tried not to go overboard; in this scale no chips would be visible in reality, but they do give some visual interest to the model. I also used sponge chipping on the barrel and larger surfaces – again, trying my best not to overdo the effect.

This is when I painted the tracks and the rubber rims of the roadwheels with a fine brush- again I used very dark greys instead of black.

I rusted up the exhaust: on a black base I deposited a bright, rust colored pigment (Humbrol Rust), which was treated with various dark colored wash unevenly to create patches. The end of the exhaust and the mud guard below it got a tiny bit of black to represent soot; I tried not to go overboard. The thin metal sheet that forms the exhaust guard got a really heavy chipping treatment. Because of the constant heat coming from the exhaust pipes this thin piece of metal would be constantly heated, which promotes heavy oxidation.

I made a very light slurry of a reddish rust colored wash, and applied it over the larger chips on the barrel and the exhaust covers; once dry I could adjust the effect using a wet brush. (When I use the term “wet brush” it means a brush dipped into the appropriate solvent dabbed onto a piece of rag.)  I added extra heavy layers on the exhaust guards. Later I adjusted the effect with different rust colored paints to make this piece look even more oxidated.

I always liked the dusty look of some of the tanks in World of Tanks: a very light colored dust layer covering the lower parts, which gets fainter and fainter as we go up the hull/turret. I dabbed “Dust Effects” by AK Interactive onto the upper part of the superstructure and the turret with a brush; this product has a very light color – too light for an European setting I think, but very close to the color from the game. I left it dry overnight (it looked horrendous, causing me no small worries), and in the morning (during my morning coffee) I adjusted it with a wet brush (using white spirit). It formed a layer similar to the effect seen in the game, but I could not make the transition completely smooth; for this I would have to airbrush the product. (I know it’s possible, but I’m reluctant to airbrush non-water based paints.)

The lower chassis got slurry of light brown pigments suspended in Mig’s neutral wash. (I have no idea what I should be using this product for, so I use it for making mud).  It creates a dark grey/brown effect used in conjunction with the brown pigments, which is very similar to actual mud in many parts of the world. The excess was wiped off once the mixture dried, and I repeated the process with a darker mixture on a smaller area to form layers of dry and fresh mud. I covered the upper parts with a sheet of paper, and created some mud splashes flicking a brush loaded with the mud-mixture. The tracks got some extra treatment of mud.

To lighten the colors a bit -and make the model look more realistic- I sprayed flat varnish onto the FV.

As a final step I rubbed a silver pen on the tracks and the edges of the model to simulate the shine of worn metal, and called the model finished.

To honest I’m quite happy with the results; despite of the issues coming up while building the model, it turned out to be a good project at the end. Let’s hope the in-game tank will also prove to be a pleasant surprise once I get there. Which should be about 200 more games…

ACE Model 1/72 FV4005 Stage 2 -part 1.

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This has been one of those vehicles I would never have learned about had it not been for World of Tanks. It looks weird with the giant turret, which immediately makes it attractive. This and the fact that it has recently been buffed in-game made me decide to grind it out (a long commitment, and my first would-be tier X tank). In the meanwhile I’ve got the model to build.

There are not many models available of this vehicle, which is not surprising. British armor has been neglected by companies, and experimental British armor doubly so. Apart from this version, there’s a Cromwell Models resin kit out there, and that’s it as far as I know. It was really good to find a plastic version available -it’s both cheaper and easier to obtain than a limited-run resin model. Since Ace has a line of Centurions, it was not a big investment to make this weird-looking tank destroyer into a model; and good for them (and us) I would say.

The model is by no means perfect, but it’s OK. The detail is soft at places, and the fit is, well, hit-and-miss. The instructions could use some improvement, and the sprues are not always labelled correctly. The model also has rubber-band style tracks, which are less than ideal; I prefer the plastic alternative. On the other hand these issues are not deal-breakers; it is just a warning that it’s not a shake-and-bake model.

The kit does come with some PE, and it considerably improves the model. Once you’re finished it’s not a bad kit when it comes to detail; in fact I am quite happy with it. (I did take a short-cut: because the side skirts hide most of the running gear and the tracks, I was not very careful building them -which considerably improved the building time. Since it’s not visible, no-one has to know, right?) The tow-cables are not very good (the moulding is not perfect), but I’ve decided to use them for the review.

Most of the gaps were easy to fill in with putty. The one in the front, however, is a contentious issue; and this is the one issue I did not like about the kit. I tried to fill it in completely so it would blend the top of the hull and the frontal plate together, but the step between the front glacis and the top was too big. The hatch detail on the top was too close to the edge so I could not trim it to shape it to the front armor. Unfortunately there is still a visible step remaining (which kind of looks intentional, so if you don’t know the type you may think it is a design feature). The other big fit issue was the mudguard: the front parts just could not be fitted without a major surgery, so I just left them off. Battle damage.

 

Now the model is finally done and ready for the paint. The only question remains: which non-historical camo pattern I should pick from the game?

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