All posts by fossiljellyfish

I'm a biologist who enjoys building scale models... I write popular science articles in my spare time, play World of Tanks, and publish scale model reviews in Armorama. I have decided to start a blog to show the work I've been doing; any comments are welcome. Please subscribe to the blog, and give regular feedback; this would greatly help me to improve both my skills and my blog.

Artel W Miniatures: Red Angel Bust

This is my first ever bust. Normally I am wary of these things because skin tones are not something I have experience with, and this thing costs a lot of money. But it actually depicts Angron in a way I really like (not just some foam-in-the-mouth berserker), so I bought it. (They have a small Angron, too, if you are interested.)

The package is pretty cool – you do feel you have a premium model in your hand. Black box with foam packed parts – now I finished the model I really do not know what to do with it, because it would be a shame to discard it.

I painted and built the bust over three years; I just never had the fortitude to get on with it. (I was afraid to fail.) The assembly is simple, and the model fits well (apart from a seamline on the back, which I will cover with a piece of chain. If you paint after assembly it can be easily filled with putty. The head fits in wonderfully: the bottom is rounded, and fits into its “socket” in one way only without the use of locating pins or pegs; I found it pretty neat.

Anyhow, I painted the base of the armor using Vallejo’s gold, then gave it depth using several layers of AK Interactive’s true metal gold, old bronze and copper.

Most of the other colors were achieved with oil paints (with some acrylic help when I needed a strong coverage). Overall I am pretty pleased with the results. Absolutely recommended; this bust will most definitely stand out on any model collection… Now I just need to get a stand for this guy.

Perturbado

I have no idea who makes this figure – I got it from a Facebook buy/sell group (as I do a lot of stuff, because buying used is significantly cheaper).

He is about the size of a space marine (probably a tad smaller), which is to say, he is small. I guess he can be seen as a practice for the larger-scale version by Mystic Wargames which I am currently painting and reviewing.

Heresy Lab: Lord of Decay, Rage Lords

It is great to be a mini painter these days -even an amateur one, like myself. We have options now, and options are good for us. In this case we have yet another option for Mortarion, Primarch of the Death guard, this time from Heresy Labs. (There are also two options from Mystic Wargames, should you be interested. I know I am; they are on the bucket list, among a thousand other items. Perhaps I was not as close to Nirvana as I thought I was.)

I wrote a review about the figure on Modelgeek if interested; here is the painted product.

The good thing about the Death Guard is that “messy” and “dirty” are part and parcel of the whole thing. Easy to paint for armor painters…

Avunculus Fragili part 2.

Well, I introduced him in a previous post. Since then he has undergone some improvement (at least I would like to think so). He is a riot of colors, but he IS a chaos knight after all.

I used one of Wargame Exclusive‘s chaos trophies on the pauldron (the rest will go on the chaos Warhound when I get to build it finally), and some of the extra heads as trophies from the set itself.

So let me introduce Mr Fragile v2.0: a more colorful version. What really, really annoys me that he had a buddy unassembled, and he seems to have gone missing when I moved back to Hungary two years ago. I just can’t find the sprues.

Anyhow. He still needs his mask, some tweaking, and I would add some more weathering- some oil streaks and whatnot. But I have to say I am pretty happy with the result. And I know. It is not a Golden Demon contender… but he is my chaos knight.

Also, if you play, I found a cheaper proxy for Knights.

Some finished photos

Now, where could the other knight be? I even have a resin pilot waiting for it…

MINIART WERKSTATT KRAFTWAGEN TYP-03-30 Build Review Part 5.

Part 1.

Part 2.

Part 3.

Part 4.

Attached the rack to the top, and then painted and weathered all the baggage.

This essentially concluded the building process. Some adjustments here and there are still done, but the model is essentially ready. The smaller details will be added in the upcoming week (or two), and I will post the result. Some oil cans, gas cylinders are missing still, but I think the weathering is finished, so once they are installed, the model will be officially ready, too.

Overall I would say this is an interesting subject, a relatively well designed model, with the caveat of the assembly of the chassis, the running gear and the bonnet.

MINIART WERKSTATT KRAFTWAGEN TYP-03-30 Build Review Part 4.

Part 1.

Part 2.

Part 3.

The doors were weathered inside and out. I used oils straight to modulate their colors from the inside, some dark and rush washes to make them look used. I chose two of the posters and glued them onto the back door. I used a very faint rust wash on the seams – using rust colored pigments suspended in ZestIt.

The outside got several layers of splashed mud using the same basic mixture of dust colored pigments, AK’s resin thickening agent, and water with other colored pigments added between applications. I used the usual method of splattering this mixture onto the model with the help of an old brush and a toothpick. The secret of realistic looking result is several, almost invisible layers on top of each other; just swamping the surface with a single dust/mud color will make the model look, well, not good, as I experienced it when I started using pigments and other products, expecting to see the same results as can be seen on the packaging.

The top of the bus got a much lighter mixture of dust colored pigments. I used both AK’s pencils and Tamiya’s dust weathering stick to achieve the effect. The good thing about these products is that you can just add them onto the surface with a copious amount of water, wait until they dry, and then use a wet brush to adjust the effect to your heart’s content.

I also dusted up the windows a bit; after all you can’t expect them to be completely clean if the vehicle is dusty.

I Have achieved Nirvana

There are no models left that I really, really want to buy. Sure, there are models on my wishlist, but nothing I would spend money on right now (maybe with the exception of a TOGII)…

OK, this is probably a temporarily thing. But. Last week I received an order containing three things: an Amusing Hobby T-72M1 with complete interior, a Green Stuff World Chrome paint, and a Green Stuff World interference paint (because why not if I am ordering stuff anyhow).

The first two were my holy grail; every since I build models with interiors, a T-72 was high on the list. The liquid chrome is, well, looking like actual chrome.

Now I have everything I wanted. Weird feeling because as we know collecting models is a different hobby from building them, but it seems like I am content with the size of my stash.

Amusing Hobby 1/35 Ferdinand with interior part 8 Finishing the beast

The previous installments:

Part 1.

Part 2.

Part 3.

Part 4.

Part 5.

Part 5.1

Part 6.

Part 7.

OK, the final push… fixing the running gear, painting small details, and dusting it up. (I wanted to leave scratches and paintchips off this time; historically it is more accurate, but the real reason is that I am experimenting with effects. I don’t want all my models look the same.)

The running gear was somewhat damaged during the subsequent handling, so I had to do some fixing, painting and extra weathering. It is not perfect I admit.

I painted smaller details, like the plug on the machine gun port.

And finally, I added dust and mud.

I started with Mig Ammo’s washable dust. I never managed to actually wash it back off (it sticks quite well to the matte surfaces I prefer, and it runs into tiny droplets when sprayed onto smooth surface), but it is a very good-looking dust paint. I carefuly built up the dust effect from the bottom up using an airbrush. The horizontal top surfaces got dust layers using a brush, and I did manage to wash them back before full drying.

Added streaks using AK’s weathering pencils and some streaking products.

The bottom part (running gear, mud guards, etc) got light washes of different mud-colored pigments; after drying it looks pretty convincing. (The one big thing I need to learn is creating mud with volume…)

The running gear, the tracks, the edges were lined with a silver pencil to give a slight metallic shine to the model, and essentially I was done. The model is ready (yes, there could be some more things done with it, but for now I declare it finished).

The interior can be seen through the transparent parts I left unpainted; however it was quite difficult to take photos through them, so here are some photos from the building phase as reminder.

Overall, Amusing Hobby managed to create a complex model with an interior which is relatively easy to assemble, although there are some problematic areas. The top of the superstructure does not fit very well, and the individual track links are no ideal, either. There are some other fit issues I mentioned in the posts about the assembly, and as Peter kindly commented, the interior is not perfectly replicated. Regardless, the model is highly recommended: it builds up into an impressive replica of the Ferdinand tank destroyer, and all that space inside is perfectly filled out with interesting details.

Now off to finish some long-outstanding builds before starting that T-72

One last thing to mention.

On this photo used to promote Amusing Hobby’s new version of the Elephan it totally looks like if that dude was milking the vehicle.

That is all.

MINIART WERKSTATT KRAFTWAGEN TYP-03-30 Build Review Part 3.

Part 1.

Part 2.

OK, I finished all the little details, added everything, and it looks pretty cool. I have to say I am very pleased with the results… it is now time to hide them.

The headlights were painted with the chrome paint from Green Stuff World. The thing is simply amazing. It looks just like liquid chrome.

I closed down the top of the vehicle, and painted the exterior in dunkelgelb. I used liquid mask on the windows, but the mask was way too thin, and on some places the paint actually stuck to the transparent plastic; it took some care to remove it without scratching the windows. The few remaining scratches will be covered up with dust. (Yes, I admit it. We all do it, right?)

You can clearly see where the hooks for the ladder broke off… Beh. Looking at the photos one of the front wheels look wobbly; this was a damage occupred during the handling of the model. As I said before, the attachment point is not exactly robust. I also found a curious issue: the rectangular transparent plastic on the top of the windshield does not actually fit into the rectangular hole. I might just leave it out – the new users (Germans) would not need the number sign on their captured bus.

All the juicy details are now hidden inside; I feel quite conflicted about it; I probably should have done something to make the top removable.

Next up: weathering and finishing the model. I hope.