Trumpeter BTM-3 High Speed Trench Digger part 3

Technical issues: I am slowly running out of space in WordPress, so now I am experimenting. I can insert photos from link, but then there is no option for albums; please let me know if this format works.

Back to the build

Part 1 and Part 2.

WEATHERING! At last…

Usually when I get to this stage I am fatigued of the build, and just rush it. So now I will try to take it slow. (Having several projects running is useful.)

First off: mud.

As I mentioned I am not good at making good-looking mud. I bought several products, several magazines, books on model building, read and watched stuff online, but it just does not work as well as for the professionals. I guess practice and patience; even the ready made products won’t save you from these (so why waste your money on them?) Why indeed.

I liked the above video because it is very useful in getting the right colors -this is crucial. I have several “earth” colored pigments but none of them are ideal when you are looking to get dried mud. Dry mud is light; most earth colored products are very dark (as dark as the real thing, without the scale effect taken into consideration). The second useful thing to learn -as with all weathering- is the matter of layers. Lots and lots of layers. (Since I want a really muddy underside, I used a much thicker mud in the beginning.)

First layer: AK’s resin base to give volume and some earth pigments. The results are not very good looking.

I sprayed earth and sand colors on the top part of the chassis to simulate dried mud. Not very convincing.

More layers using Tamiya’s concrete colored weathering paste and pigments. Getting better.

At this stage I added the tracks (also treated with a thin version of this mix, after painting).

More coloring was added using different, lighter pigments to give it depth, similarly to how the above video is suggesting, and for now the mud is done.

I had some internal discussions about the order of the next steps: paint damage, washes and filters. I decided to keep it in this order.

I started with the paint damage. I really want to show a used (but not overused) vehicle, kind of like an old agricultural tractor. Most of the chipping was on the digger part, but some rust is present on the cab as well. First step: applying patches and scratches of light green with a sponge and a brush.

These are filled out with Vallejo’s black brown with a brush, giving them depth. When all is finished, the edges are rubbed with a silver pencil to give a metallic shine to the whole thing.

The digging buckets received much larger chips painted by hand, as these receive some serious abuse while digging the earth.

The cab area is treated with lighter/brighter rust colors as the metal is much thinner here, and the rust is not polished off by the constant movement. (I don’t think there would be much rust on the digging apparatus.) Because I used pre-shading, chipping fluids are out, so manual painting is in…

I also added a lot of lighter dust color on the top and other parts of the vehicle using pigments, AK’s dust products and AK’s pencils.

The headlight was painted with Green Stuff’s liquid chrome… incredible stuff. It looks like real chrome. I felt it would be a shame to cover it with the transparent piece, so I left it bare.

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