Flyhawk Luchs 1/72 part 2.

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Well, it’s been a long time coming: I just realized I’ve forgotten to finish the Flyhawk Luchs build review I started a while ago. My bad.

So, as a reminder, here’s the kit:

 

And here’s the building process:

 

OK, now onto painting.

I managed to snap the width indicator rods, so I replaced them with a PE set by Dan Taylor Modelworks (I got them from the Milicast website if interested).

The first layer was a primer- simply used a spraycan of grey primer. While they are easy and fast to use, there is always a danger of flooding the details with paint; I think from now on I’ll use my airbrush to apply primer. (Primer is not strictly necessary: modern acrylic paints are pretty good at sticking to the surface without it, but I still prefer it as it will provide an uniform surface. If you use dark primer, it serves as a pre-shade as well.)

I used Mig Ammo’s dunkelgelb, and this time I followed the instructions. The first time I used these paints I assumed they’d work like any acrylic paint I used before, and was frustrated when they did not. After seeing their youtube tutorial, I was able to actually use it correctly. Well, read the manual is the take home message from this. I’ve found these paints to be really good, by the way. Right now I’m torn between these and the trusty Tamiya paints. (Tamiya gives some amazingly flat finish, so there are definite advantages.)

I added some pigments mixed with plaster to the lower chassis to simulate mud, installed the running gear and the tracks, and proceeded with the camouflage. (Well not strictly in this order, but for the narrative’s sake let’s pretend.)

Anyhow. This step was fine; the next, however, was a fateful one.

I hand painted the camouflage.

And I failed to lighten the camo colors to a suitable level… Disaster struck, in other words.

The issue was that I, for some reason, failed to appreciate the scale effect: namely that the same colors look much darker on a small model than on a large vehicle. I also use the base color normally with the darker colors to lessen the contrast; otherwise you’ll end up with a very strongly contrasting, very unrealistic paintjob (don’t even get me started on the obvious brushwork; the spots should be airbrushed, but in this scale it’s a tad difficult).

Which I did. (Apologies for the wildly varying photo quality -living in a small London apartment makes setting up the photobooth a choir, and sometimes I just skip it if I only have to snap a photo or two.)

As you can see the results are toy-like; on a real tank these colors would blend in with each other. Filters are an excellent way to blend them together, but if the contrast is too high, they will not be as effective. On the photos with a incorrectly set white balance (the yellowish ones) you can see the effects of several light dark brown filters; some of the contrast disappeared.

 

At this point I put the tank in a box and scrubbed its memory out of my mind. The Flyhawk kit is really a feat of model kit engineering, essentially a shrunken 1/35 model, and it was not a pleasant thought that I made a mess of the paintjob.

The next breakthrough came with an idea: use some washable dust (again by Mig Ammo). Since I had nothing to lose at this part. A very light mist of the paint actually brought the whole camo scheme together: suddenly the tank looked much better (something I dare to present in front of others).

 

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