MiniArt T-44 Build review p5.

Well, further work is ongoing on the MiniArt T-44: weathering.

The tank was first treated with AK Interactive’s filter for green vehicles. (I’ve made a purchase of a couple of these products, and wanted to try them out.) Interestingly the paint simply flaked off at the mudguards in reaction to the filter. I think the acrylic primer coat did not react well to the solvent; it’s not a promising sign. I think I’ll keep to the home-made stuff in the future – it’s not difficult to make, and it’s gentler on the paint. The damage was not actually bad; I could use white glue to simply fix the large flake, and it actually looks pretty real -if you look at vehicles, the paint sometimes does flake off on thinner metal plates.

Regardless it’s not something I want to experience again.

Strictly speaking you don’t need filters; I like to use them because they are great for modulating the base color. I used several types of green (olive green by Citadel, dark green, Russian green by Tamiya mixed with tan), but I needed some orange-yellowish hue to this green. Filters are great way to achieve this. (A blue filter is also great for a German grey vehicle, for example.)

Chipping

I wanted to try the Windex method, however the Windex did not arrive in time, so I went back to plan B: painting the chips. I’ve used Citadell’s Goblin Green to paint scratches and chips onto the surface of the tank. I’ve used both a thin brush and a sponge dabbed into the paint. (Make sure you dab the sponge onto some paper first, to get rid of most of the paint. Remember: you can always add more later. It’s harder to remove the unwanted paint.) I eyeballed the model, and tried to put the chips where the surface is most exposed to wear and tear: corners, edges, protruding parts, etc. It’s worth doing it in several steps: do a session, put it away until next day, take a fresh look at the model, add some more chips.

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In the second step I used a dark brown paint to paint in the middle of the green chips, simulating the exposed metal. Here the same principles apply: the less is more. Use a brush, a sponge, and do it in sessions. The results are pretty convincing.gjge7xdji9rpmz

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The flaking paint is obvious on the lower left corner; it kind of looks realistic, though.

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Decals

Once the filter was dry, I used a semi-gloss vanish to form a base for the decals. I’ve chosen the most colorful option with all the crests and huge text on the front. After they dried, I applied another layer of varnish, and on came the washes. tienpmn4xg0qly

I used the Mig Productions dark wash as a pin wash, and also used it as a general wash on the turret to bring out the casting details. After about 15-20 minutes I used a damp brush (loaded with white spirit) to remove most of the wash from the turret, and to “tidy up” the pin washes. This step is necessary, as the wash often forms a “tide mark” on the surface. By applying a damp brush with downwards strokes you can actually use it to your advantage, and form the first very faint streak lines.
I have to admit I’m not a fan of general washes, so I was pretty worried that I just messed up the turret; especially that I was not sure when the paint will start being rubbed off -the wash did cling to the surface quite tenaciously. At the end it worked out fine, but it was still a harrowing experience.
Two days after the wash was applied, I used Testor’s Dullcote to form a flat surface for the next steps.

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The next step was to use oil paints straight out of the tube. On the flat, sloping surfaces I used them to create faint streaks, but on most other places I used them to give some tonal variation to the green color. I used a greenish/yellowish color on corners, which was followed with burnt umber later on.

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You can see how the edges, corners were shaded with oil paints on the photo above. I mostly used burned umber. Just a tiny dot of paint is enough, which is blended into the base color with a dry brush gently. Oil colors are quite transparent, so they’ll be perfect for this purpose. On the flat horizontal surface I used yellows and greens to give some tonal variation for the paint.j9enhhruijux41

The next step was to use yellow, rust brown, burned umber to create streaks on the vertical surfaces. Again: a tiny dot of paint is blended with downwards motion, but this time with a slightly wet brush. The streaks are gently shaped from the sides as well with a clean, wet brush, if they become too wide or too prominent.

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After this my least practiced part of model building: dust and dirt.

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